Ransomware updates (1)

I can’t say that the ransomware landscape hasn’t been busy for the past week or two, but so have I, on entirely different issues. I have been adding links etc. to resources pages, and they’re not all referenced here, but here’s an update on some stuff I’ve added today.

(1) Cylance’s analysis of AlphaLocker. (HT to Artem Baranov for drawing my attention to it.) Useful stuff, despite the customary AV-knocking.

(2) Help Net Security posted a useful update referring to commentary from Kaspersky – New ransomware modifications increase 14%. Points made in the article include these:

  • The (sub)title refers to 2,896 modifications made to ransomware in the first quarter of 2016, an increase of 14%, and a 30% increase in attempted ransomware attacks.
  • According to Kaspersky, the ‘top three’ offenders are ‘Teslacrypt (58.4%), CTB Locker (23.5%), and Cryptowall (3.4%).’ Locky and Petya also get a namecheck.
  • Kaspersky also reports that mobile ransomware has increased ‘from 1,984 in Q4, 2015 to 2,895 in Q1,2016.’

(3) Graham Cluley, for ESET, quotes the FBI: No, you shouldn’t pay ransomware extortionists. Encouragingly, the agency seems to have modified its previous stance in its more recent advisory. The agency also offers a series of tips on reducing the risk of succumbing to a ransomware attack. Basic advice, but it will benefit individuals as well as corporate users, and reduce the risk from other kinds of attack too. I was mildly amused, though, to read in the FBI tips:

– Secure your backups. Make sure they aren’t connected to the computers and networks they are backing up.

It’s a bit tricky to back up data without connecting to the system used for primary storage. I think what the FBI probably meant was that you shouldn’t have your secure backups routinely or permanently accessible from that system, since that entails the strong risk that the backups will also be encrypted.

The tips include a link to an FBI brochure that unequivocally discourages victims from paying the ransom, as well as expanding on its advice. And it is clearer on the risk to backups:

 Examples might be securing backups in the cloud or physically storing offline. Some instances of ransomware have the capability to lock cloud-based backups when systems continuously back up in real time, also known as persistent synchronization. Backups are critical in ransomware; if you are infected, this may be the best way to recover your critical data.

David Harley

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