27th July 2018 Resource updates

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources 

John Leyden for The Register: Criminal mastermind injects malicious script into Ethereum tracker. Their message? ‘1337’ – “The Etherscan incident could have been far worse. Rather than a cheeky pop-up, a more mendacious mind might just have easily used the same flaw to run a crypto-mining scam.”

SecureList (Kaspersky): A mining multitool – “Symbiosis of PowerShell and EternalBlue for cryptocurrency mining… The creators of PowerGhost …  started using fileless techniques to establish the illegal miner within the victim system. It appears the growing popularity and rates of cryptocurrencies have convinced the bad guys of the need to invest in new mining techniques – as our data demonstrates, miners are gradually replacing ransomware Trojans.”

Graham Cluley: Mind your company’s old Twitter accounts, rather than allowing them to be hijacked by hackers  – “DEFUNCT FOX TV SHOW HAS ITS TWITTER ACCOUNT COMPROMISED BY CRYPTOCURRENCY SCAMMERS.” “…it appears that hackers seized control of the moribund Twitter account and gave it a new lease of life promoting cryptocurrency scams.

Updates to Tech support scams resource page

ZDnet: US makes an example of Indian call center scam artists with stiff sentences – “The worst offenders have been thrown behind bars for up to 20 years… a number of call centers were established in Ahmedabad, India, in which operators impersonated the IRS and USCIS… in order to threaten US victims with arrest, prison, fines, and deportation unless they paid money they apparently owed.”

Updates to Chain Mail Check

An excellent article has just been published by my ESET colleague Lysa Myers. Companies actually compound the phishing problem when they send poorly thought-out messages that are indistinguishable from phishing messages, both to their own staff and to customers (some banks are particularly culpable here). As a result, recipients of such messages are conditioned into accepting without suspicion messages that don’t conform to good practice, and are more susceptible to being taken in by phishing messages. Hook, line, and sinker: How to avoid looking ‘phish-y’  In addition, Lysa points out an issue I hadn’t really considered: “An increasingly common scenario is phishy-looking emails sent by Software as a Service (SaaS) apps like those for fax or shipping services, human resource or accounting portals, collaboration tools, newsletters or even party planners.”

Another colleague (and long-time friend), Bruce P. Burrell, expands on the story I referred to briefly here – Sextortion and leaked passwords – with this article: I saw what you did…or did I? – “It might seem legit but there are several reasons why you should not always hit the panic button when someone claims to have your email password.” Not just a rehash of the news story, but the precursor to what I expect to be a very useful second article with advice from a seasoned security researcher.

Updates to Mac Virus

[update:  for ESET – Fake banking apps on Google Play leak stolen credit card data – “Fraudsters are using bogus apps to convince users of three Indian banks to divulge their personal data”]

Catalin Cimpanu: Chrome Extensions, Android and iOS Apps Caught Collecting Browsing Data – “An investigation by AdGuard, an ad-blocking platform, has revealed a common link between several Chrome and Firefox extensions and Android & iOS apps that were caught collecting highly personal user data through various shady tactics.”

Pierluigi Paganini: CSE Malware ZLab – APT-C-27 ’s long-term espionage campaign in Syria is still ongoing. After ESET’s Lukas Stefanko revealed the existence of a repository containing Android applications, researchers from CSE Cybsec Z-Lab identified spyware that was “part or the arsenal of a APT group tracked as APT-C-27, aka Golden Rat Organization.” In recent years the group has been focusing its activities in Syria. Here’s the ZLAB Malware Analysis Report.

The Hacker News: iPhone Hacking Campaign Using MDM Software Is Broader Than Previously Known – “India-linked highly targeted mobile malware campaign, first unveiled two weeks ago, has been found to be part of a broader campaign targeting multiple platforms, including windows devices and possibly Android as well.”

Sophos: Red Alert 2.0: Android Trojan targets security-seekers – “A malicious, counterfeit version of a VPN client for mobile devices targets security-minded victims with a RAT.”

David Bisson for Tripwire: Exobot Android Banking Trojan’s Source Code Leaked Online -“Bleeping Computer said it received a copy of the source code from an unknown individual in June. In response, it verified the authenticity of the code with both ESET and ThreatFabric…Exobot is a type of malware that targets Android users via malicious apps. Some of those programs made their way onto the Google Play Store at one point.”

David Harley

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