Category Archives: Internet of Things

Devices on the dark side of your network

Infoblox have a very interesting report on What is Lurking on Your Network – Exposing the threat of shadow devices.

In his foreword, Gary Cox says:

“For IT departments, the complexities and security issues around managing BYOD schemes and unsanctioned Shadow IT operations have long been a cause for concern.

“In an increasingly complex, connected world, this challenge has now been exacerbated by the explosion in the number of personal devices individuals own, as well as the plethora of new IoT devices being added to the network.”

More reasons to feel uncomfortable with the unfettered enthusiasm for BYOD.

Commentary/summary from Help Net Security: Exposing the threat of shadow devices: “Employees in the US and UK admitted to connecting to the enterprise network for a number of reasons, including to access social media (39 percent), as well as to download apps, games and films … These practices open organizations up to social engineering hacks, phishing and malware injection.”

David Harley

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IoT resource/news updates

Updates to Internet of (not necessarily necessary) Things

[Many of the Things that crop up on this page are indeed necessary. But that doesn’t mean that connecting them to the Internet of Things (or even the Internet of Everything) is necessary, or even desirable, given how often that connectivity widens the attack surface.]

(1) Brian Krebs talks about the asymmetry in cost and incentives when IoT devices are recruited for DDoS attacks like one conducted against his site: Study: Attack on KrebsOnSecurity Cost IoT Device Owners $323K.

He observes: “The attacker who wanted to clobber my site paid a few hundred dollars to rent a tiny portion of a much bigger Mirai crime machine. That attack would likely have cost millions of dollars to mitigate. The consumers in possession of the IoT devices that did the attacking probably realized a few dollars in losses each, if that. Perhaps forever unmeasured are the many Web sites and Internet users whose connection speeds are often collateral damage in DDoS attacks.”

Some of his conclusions are based on a paper from researchers at University of California, Berkeley School of Information: the very interesting report “rIoT: Quantifying Consumer Costs of Insecure Internet of Things Devices.

(2) Product test specialists AV-Test conducted research into the security of a number of fitness trackers (plus the multi-functional Apple watch: Fitness Trackers – 13 Wearables in a Security Test. On this occasion, the results are fairly encouraging.

(3) Bleeping Computer: 5,000 Routers With No Telnet Password. Nothing to See Here! Move Along! – “The researcher pointed us to one of the router’s manuals which suggests the devices come with a passwordless Telnet service by default, meaning users must configure one themselves.”

(4) Help Net Security: Hacking for fun and profit: How one researcher is making IoT device makers take security seriously  Based on research by Ken Munro and Pen Test Partners.

David Harley