Tag Archives: AMTSO

May 30th updates

Updates to Anti-Social Media 

Sophos: Facebook battles tiny startup over privacy accusations John E. Dunn remarks:

“You can argue Six4Three’s allegations either way … they’re another example of the way the company perfectly understood the value of its user data and wanted to monetise it.”

“Alternatively, by restricting third parties, Facebook was simply reigning in risky access that privacy advocates believe should never have been allowed in the first place.”

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources

ESET: UNICEF now using cryptocurrency mining for fundraising – “So far in 2018, the NGO has launched two charity campaigns with the aim of raising funds through cryptocurrency mining.”

Technode: Qihoo 360 discovers high-risk security issues in EOS, says 80% digital wallets have problems – “Blockchain platform EOS is facing a series of high-risk security vulnerabilities, according to Chinese cybersecurity company Qihoo 360 […] EOS is a blockchain-based, decentralized system that enables the development, hosting, and execution of commercial-scale decentralized applications (dApps) on its platform.”

Updates to GDPR page

The Register: Businesses brace themselves for a kicking as GDPR blows in – “Securing company data just got even harder”

Updates to Internet of (not necessarily necessary) Things

The Register: Softbank’s ‘Pepper’ robot is a security joke – “Big-in-Japan ‘bot offers root access through hard-coded password and worse bugs too”

Sophos: California tests digital license plates. Is tracking cars next? –  Lisa Vaas comments: ‘Yes, now we can add license plates to the pile of “do we really need xyz IoT thing,” which already includes internet-enabled fridges, toasters, washing machines and coffee makers.’ And mentions quite a few of the issues that this initiative raises. What could go wrong?

Updates to MELTDOWN/SPECTRE AND OTHER CHIP-RELATED RESOURCES

Interesting paper: Post-Spectre Threat Model Re-Think

Updates to Mac Virus

(1) Bleeping Computer: Malware Found in the Firmware of 141 Low-Cost Android Devices – “Two years after being outed, a criminal operation that has been inserting malware in the firmware of low-cost Android devices is still up and running, and has even expanded its reach.” 

Dr Web report from 2016: Doctor Web discovers Trojans in firmware of well-known Android mobile devices – “Doctor Web’s security researchers found new Trojans incorporated into firmwares of several dozens of Android mobile devices. Found malware programs are stored in system catalogs and covertly download and install programs.”

Avast report from 24th May 2018: Android devices ship with pre-installed malware – “The Avast Threat Labs has found adware pre-installed on several hundred different Android device models and versions, including devices from manufacturers like ZTE and Archos. The majority of these devices are not certified by Google.”

(2) Meanwhile, Sophos’ Matt Boddy has been looking at how to find out the answer to the question Are your Android apps sending unencrypted data? He says:

“My concerns led me to do some network analysis on popular Android apps, following the methodology set out in the OWASP Mobile Security Testing Guide.

I’ll tell you what I did, what I discovered and how you can do it too.”

Updates to Anti-Malware Testing

AMTSO has issued press releases – AMTSO Membership Approves Major Step Forward in Testing Standards and AMTSO Announces Full Adoption of Testing Protocol Standard following the approval by a majority of AMTSO members of its Draft Standards and authorization of a working group at the recent AMTSO meeting.

No information at present on exactly how the voting went, which I’d like to have seen in the interests of transparency.

David Harley

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21st May 2018 update

Updates to Anti-Social Media 

Bleeping Computer: The Facebook Android App Is Asking for Superuser Privileges and Users Are Freaking Out

New Scientist: Huge new Facebook data leak exposed intimate details of 3m users  – “Data from millions of Facebook users who used a popular personality app, including their answers to intimate questionnaires, was left exposed online for anyone to access, a New Scientist investigation has found.” And some commentary from The Register: How could the Facebook data slurping scandal get worse? Glad you asked – “Three million “intimate” user profiles offered to researchers”

And commentary from Sophos: Facebook app left 3 million users’ data exposed for four years

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources

US Securities and Exchange Commission: The SEC Has an Opportunity You Won’t Want to Miss: Act Now! – “The SEC set up a website, HoweyCoins.com, that mimics a bogus coin offering to educate investors about what to look for before they invest in a scam. Anyone who clicks on “Buy Coins Now” will be led instead to investor education tools and tips from the SEC and other financial regulators.” Commentary from Sophos: Don’t invest! The ICO scam that doesn’t want your money

ZDNet: Brutal cryptocurrency mining malware crashes your PC when discovered  – “…the cybersecurity firm said the cryptomining malware aims to infect PCs in order to steal processing power for the purpose of mining the Monero cryptocurrency.”

Help Net Security: 25% of companies affected by cloud cryptojacking

Updates to Internet of (not necessarily necessary) Things

[Many of the Things that crop up on this page may indeed be necessary. But that doesn’t mean that connecting them to the Internet of Things (or even the Internet of Everything) is necessary, or even desirable, given how often that connectivity widens the attack surface.]

Updates to Tech support scams resource page

Malwarebytes: Fake Malwarebytes helpline scammer caught in the act – Given how much work Malwarebytes have done on these scams, not good targeting on the scammer’s part.

Updates to Specific Ransomware Families and Types

Bleeping Computer: New Bip Dharma Ransomware Variant Released

ArsTechnica: All of Mugshots.com’s alleged co-owners arrested on extortion charges

Updates to Mac Virus

Bleeping Computer: The Facebook Android App Is Asking for Superuser Privileges and Users Are Freaking Out

Help Net Security: Google will force Android OEMs to push out security patches regularly

Kaspersky: WHO’S WHO IN THE ZOO. CYBERESPIONAGE OPERATION TARGETS ANDROID USERS IN THE MIDDLE EAST

Symantec: Malicious Apps Persistently Appearing on Google Play and Using Google Icons
– “Seven apps have been discovered reappearing on the Play store under a different name and publisher even after these have been reported.”

Sophos: The next Android version’s killer feature? Security patches “…the next version of Google’s mobile OS will require device makers to agree to implement regular security patches for the first time in the operating system’s history.’

Updates to Anti-Malware Testing

I worked with Symantec’s Mark Kennedy for some time when I was on the AMTSO Board of Directors. He knows much more than most about the organization and product testing in general, and this is an excellent and informative article: AMTSO Testing Standards: Why You Should Demand Them – “When it comes to security product testing, a good test in one context can turn out to be meaningless in another.”

Updates to Chain Mail Check

US Securities and Exchange Commission: The SEC Has an Opportunity You Won’t Want to Miss: Act Now! – “The SEC set up a website, HoweyCoins.com, that mimics a bogus coin offering to educate investors about what to look for before they invest in a scam. Anyone who clicks on “Buy Coins Now” will be led instead to investor education tools and tips from the SEC and other financial regulators.” Commentary from Sophos: Don’t invest! The ICO scam that doesn’t want your money

Malwarebytes: Fake Malwarebytes helpline scammer caught in the act – Given how much work Malwarebytes have done on these scams, not good targeting on the scammer’s part.

David Harley

AMTSO members’ workshop

Don’t you hate it when people send you “reminders” meaning “here’s something I should have told you about before”?

Well, here’s something that would have been a reminder if I’d actually blogged it here before. 🙂

The next members meeting of AMTSO (the Anti-Malware Testing Standards Organization, a body whose intent to raise AV testing standards is very dear to the hearts of some of us here), is at San Mateo, California, on February 10th-11th.

More details, including a preliminary agenda, at http://www.amtso.org/meetings.html.

David Harley CITP FBCS CISSP

More AMTSO stuff

They say there’s no such thing as bad publicity, though quite who ‘they’ are, and why ‘they’ would make such a clearly daft statement is beyond me. It seems that AMTSO has had it’s fair share of bad publicity recently –  a further example is the piece by Ed Moyle over on his blog at http://www.securitycurve.com/wordpress/archives/1773. It’s a long article, but it does show that Ed clearly doesn’t understand (or doesn’t want to accept) what AMTSO is trying to do – maybe that does just mean that AMTSO needs a better PR representation. Anyway, once again Kurt Wismer (or perhaps I should adopt his anti capitalist rendering and use kurt wismer) has provided some excellent analysis of Ed’s piece over on his blog at http://anti-virus-rants.blogspot.com/2010/07/i-see-standards-organization.html

There’s little more that really needs to be said from my perspective. For the record, I personally agree with Kurt (just can’t seem to get my head around the ‘kurt’ thing), in his analysis of the NSS report done by AMTSO – which seems to be at the root of this whole anti AMTSO campaign. The central point is that NSS did a good job, and came very close to the ideal – (if you haven’t read the review, then it’s here). It’s unfortunate that that has been taken as a negative thing or a slight against them to say that they did not fully meet the ideal standard set by AMTSO – it was still far better than many other tests, and I have every hope that people are sensible enough to recognise that. It’s hard for me to see quite how Ed jumps from that report to an accusation that AMTSO is ‘Slapping the labs’ – an argument even harder to see when a lab like Dennis Technology Lab (who have very similar methodology to NSS) voluntarily submitted their own test for the AMTSO review process (see the report here).

If there’s one thing we can learn from this, it’s that it does seem that there’s a double standard here – testers can criticise AV vendors with impunity in their reviews and tests of AV products, but when someone tries to apply that same process and rigour to the tests done by those testers, that is somehow anathema. Personally, I think that’s shoddy thinking, and I have no doubt that AMTSO will continue to strive, as it has done from inception, to provide the public with an insight into tests, and to support good testing practice (and incidentally point out less than ideal practice where needed).

Andrew Lee
AVIEN CEO / CTO K7 Computing

Virus Researchers are community outcasts

Lately I’ve been reading a lot of blogs and articles attacking and defending AMTSO and their attempt at establishing standards for the testing of counter-malware products. Unfortunately I think BOTH sides are missing the larger picture here. AMTSO was formed to address some critical shortcomings in the testing of counter-malware products: some tests were arguably unethical, most unscientific and some just poor from the word go. So where does the dissent come from? It comes from the very people who done or supported those poor non-science based tests. Yet it goes beyond that. The people who are condemning AMTSO and their efforts are in some cases well respected in the general security arena, and are very knowledgeable, and this is the rub. These people, most people in academia, and in management as well do not recognize Malware research and prevention as a specialty niche. They attempt to apply the same rule-set to fighting a malware outbreak as they do a simple intrusion, and see nothing wrong with that solution.

A majority of people not engaged in the Malware field as a profession still feel that the average Security Professional has the same knowledge and skill sets as used by the Counter Malware Professionals. Unfortunately nothing can be further from the truth. It goes beyond the abilities and skills for reverse engineering, programming, and identifying abnormal network traffic. This argument goes back to at least the early 1990’s when in a panel discussion a firewalls specialist attempted to answer a question about a virus. On that panel was Wolfgang Stiller, creator of Integrity Master Anti-Virus, Wolfgang interrupted him saying along the lines of “look I’m here for the virus questions, I would never presume to speak with authority or experience on firewalls issues, but you presume to have the same experience and expertise with viruses that I do, and that is mistaken”. Similar exchanges have happened on other panels with people such as Robert Vibert and Rob Rosenberger, among others. These are also the same people who demand that anti-malware products protect against threats that are not viruses, nor are they specifically malware, but “Potentially unwanted programs”. So this is not a new phenomenon. The question in my mind is why does it still exist?

Anti-Virus ‘Experts’ helped establish the disaster recovery field, and were among the very first to teach classes in th at subject. It was the Anti-Virus Researchers who developed the field of Computer Forensics, in both cases it was the Anti-Virus field that had the necessary expertise and skill set needed to fill the holes and expand the career field. So now that Disaster Recovery, and Computer Forensics are recognized as specialty fields and given a high degree of respect from schools and management, what happened to the Anti-Virus researcher? Their mindset is not of an operational nature, they bore easily, some may even say they have attention deficit disorder (ADD), yet they are anal about doing things the same way every-time. They dwell on minutiae, arguing to the point of splitting hairs. I sometimes think some of my colleagues can SEE the traffic on the wire in their minds eye. Yet with all this contribution to the Computer Security Community they are still (almost purposely) maligned and misunderstood. At a Virus Bulletin Conference, I stated that we as a community must take action or go from the ranks of professional, to the ranks of the tradesmen. I still don’t know what action that is, or how to go about it, but AMTSO is a good step in that direction, and the naysayers need to start looking outside their comfort zone and realize they know enough to be dangerous and not enough to be helpful at this point.

Ken Bechtel
Team Anti-Virus
Virus Researcher and Security pontificator

The edge of reason(ableness): AV Testing and the new creation scientists

First, let me start out by saying that I am in a bad mood. I probably shouldn’t write when I’m in this mood, because I’m in danger of just ranting, but I’m going to anyway. I’m in a bad mood because I am pretty fed up that some people are so deliberately trying to destroy something I’ve personally (along with many others) worked very hard to build in the last couple of years.

I’m in a bad mood because writing this is distracting me from the many other things that I need to do, and get paid to do.

I’m in a bad mood because I’m fed up with hearing that I, and others like me, have no right to comment on things that fall directly within my realm of expertise (and goodness knows, that’s a narrow enough realm) – and that if I do, it’s simply self-interested nonsense.

Secondly, let me also point out that although I’m now going to reveal that, yes, I’m talking about Anti-Malware Testing, and may mention AMTSO, I’m not speaking on behalf of AMTSO, nor my employer, nor anyone else, but me, myself and I (oh, that there were so many of us).

So, “What’s the rumpus?*” Well, in what has become an almost unbelievable farce, the last few weeks have seen mounting attacks on the AMTSO group and what it does.

For some background – those who are interested can read these articles.

http://kevtownsend.wordpress.com/2010/06/27/anti-malware-testing-standards-organization-a-dissenting-view/

http://krebsonsecurity.com/2010/06/anti-virus-is-a-poor-substitute-for-common-sense/

There are some very good points in the second (Krebs) article, although cantankerous is not something that I would say characterizes AMTSO all that well – as Lysa Myers has pointed out ‘AMTSO is made of people‘, and I think the generally negative tone employed is a shame. The first (Townsend) article is way more problematic; there’s just so much wrong with Mr Townsend’s thinking that I don’t really know where to start. Fortunately, Kurt Wismer has already done a great job of responding here, and David Harley an equally competent job here.

So why my response? Well, probably because I certainly am cantankerous.

I’m also, almost uniquely in this industry (David Harley is another), formerly one of those “users” that Mr Townsend is so adamant should be controlling the process of AMTSO’s output – indeed, the whole of AVIEN was set up in the year 2000 as an organisation of interested, non-vendor employed, users – albeit users who knew something about anti-malware issues. We were users responsible for protecting large enterprises, who wanted to be able to share breaking anti-virus information without the interference of Vendors or the noise of such cesspools as alt.comp.virus. We wanted good, reliable information.

I, like David Harley, later joined the industry as a Vendor, but I still understand what it is to be a user, and that was also a huge consideration in the setup of AMTSO – as so many have said before, and I want to reiterate here, bad testing of anti-virus products hurts everyone, the user most especially.

However, this debate is much more than just one on which we can ‘agree to differ’  – like whether Germany or Spain has the better football team might be – it’s much more fudamental than that.

Indeed, the only real analogy that comes close is that of the battle currently raging between the so called  faith based ‘science’ of creationists (let’s not prevaricate, Intelligent Design is just a euphemism for Creationism), and the research based science of evolutionary biologists and so on.

On the one hand, you have anti-malware researchers, professional testers and so on; people who study malware every day, who constantly deal with the realities of malware exploiting users, and who understand better than anyone the challenges that we face in tackling malware – if you like, the “Richard Dawkinses of anti-malware” (though I certainly would not claim to match his eloquence nor intelligence) –  and on the other hand, we have those outside the industry who say that we’re all wrong, that we’re just a “self-perpetuating cesspool populated by charlatans” (yet none the less, a cesspool at which the media feeds most voraciously), that nobody needs AV, and that everything the AV community does or says is bunk.

What I find so extraordinary (in both cases) is that those who are most in a position to provide trusted commentary on the subject are so ignored, in favour of those who have shrill, but ill-informed voices. Why is it that information from a tester; who may have just woken up one morning and decided to ‘test’ antivirus products; is taken on faith as being correct and true; and yet, when a group of professional people give up their time voluntarily, and work together to try to produce some documentation that sets out the ways in which anti-malware products can be tested effectively (and, no, that has nothing in particular to do with the WildList) and reliably, is it so violently decried as self-interested nonsense. It’s a terrible shame that science is so deliberately ignored in the face of popular opinion. Unfortunately, millions of people CAN be wrong, and often are.

AMTSO is not about dictating truth, but rather pointing out ways in which truth can be reliably found (and importantly, where it cannot).

I refuse to lie down and take it when someone tries to tell me that I’ve no right to point out the truth – and I’m not talking about truth based on some millenia old scripture, but real, hard, repeatable, scientifically verifiable, researched fact. If that makes me as unpopular as Richard Dawkins is to a creationist, then so be it.

If you’re interested in understanding why anti-virus testing is so important (and why so many professional testers participate in AMTSO) then, please, do have a read of the AMTSO scriptures er… documents, here.

Andrew Lee – AVIEN CEO, Cantankerous AV researcher.

* If you’ve not seen the excellent movie “Miller’s Crossing” you won’t know where that quote comes from.

(Thanks to Graham Cluley for pointing out that the first link didn’t go to the correct page.)

2nd Security Blogger Summit

This is an interesting event (of which I only became aware yesterday – thanks, Julio!) taking place in Madrid on 4th February. See:

http://www.securitybloggersummit.com/ 

(It’s in Spanish, but there are plenty of translation tools around nowadays to help with that for non-Spanish speakers.)

Although Panda is organizing the event, the company is being scrupulous about keeping it vendor neutral, so I won’t be attending on this, unfortunately (it looks really interesting).

The thought did occur to me, though, that a forum where independent security bloggers, industry bloggers and the media could discuss issues and approaches would be a Good Thing: a sort of AMTSO for bloggers.

Randy Abrams and I put together  a paper for AVAR last year on “practical, strategic and ethical issues that arise when the security industry augments its marketing role by taking civic responsibility for the education of the community as a whole” that seems quite relevant to that thought.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/ylfu3e6

Maybe I need to revisit it.

David Harley FBCS CITP CISSP
Chief Operations Officer, AVIEN
Director of Malware Intelligence, ESET

Also blogging at:
http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog
http://smallbluegreenblog.wordpress.com/
http://blogs.securiteam.com
http://blog.isc2.org/
http://dharley.wordpress.com

Lawyers in Love

One minute I was saying “…AMTSO in Prague next week…” and the next Prague was long gone, and so was AVAR in Kyoto. Hopefully, though, that was my last long trip for this year, and I’ll get into the habit of blogging regularly here. Well, I suppose once every blue moon is regular. 😉

This is a bit of a cheat, since I already blogged it for ESET, but I’m a believer in green blogging with lots of recycling. Juraj Malcho, head of ESET’s virus lab in Bratislava, did an excellent paper and presentation at VB 2009 on “Is there a lawyer in the lab?”: it’s about the complications that ensue when the authors of Possibly Unwanted Applications and other blahware try to tie up anti-malware companies in legal process for daring to detect it as Something Not Very Useful.

I think I may have just coined blahware: in this case, I’m referring not to those irritating Facebook applets that so many of my friends are addicted to, but to software which, if not actively malicious, is nevertheless of more value to its author than to anyone who’s misled into paying for it, and is distributed by semi-malicious channels such as spam or push-installations. I’d call it irrelevantware, but that’s not so catchy. And come to think of it, it probably does apply to most Facebook apps.

Anyway, the paper is at :

http://www.eset.com/download/whitepapers/Lawyer_in_the_lab.pdf,

The slide deck is at:

http://www.eset.com/download/whitepapers/is-there-a-lawyer-in-the-lab.pdf.

Well worth looking at, and we don’t ask you for your email address when you download them, either. 🙂

David Harley

Testing, testing

OK, we’ve used that as a title before. However, it seems quite apposite as this is my first published blog here, and it’s related to anti-malware testing. (See what I did there? :-D)

This is actually a retread of my heavily re-edited blog at securiteam. But since it concerns (obliquely, for legal reasons) an issue that some of us discussed at VB 2009, I’m quite happy to repurpose some of it here.

Principle 3 of the AMTSO (Anti-Malware Testing Standards Organization) guidelines document (http://www.amtso.org/amtso—download—amtso-fundamental-principles-of-testing.html) states that “Testing should be reasonably open and transparent.”

The document goes on to explain what information on the test and the test methodology it’s reasonable to ask for.

So my first question is, is it open and transparent for an anti-malware tester who claims that his tests are compliant with AMTSO guidelines to decline to answer a vendor’s questions or give any information about the reported performance of their product unless they buy a copy of the report or pay a consultancy fee to the tester?

Secondly, there is, of course, nothing to stop an anti-malware tester soliciting payment from the vendors whose products have been tested both in advance of the test and in response to requests for further information. But is he then entitled to claim to be independent and working without vendor funding? In what respect is this substantially different to the way in which certification testing organizations work, for example?

AMTSO will be considering those questions at its next meeting (in Prague, next week).  But there are a lot of people inside and outside AVIEN who are seriously concerned with testing standards, as an aid to evaluating products for use in their own organizations, or because they have a vocational interest in making or supporting products that are impacted by fair/unfair or good/bad testing, and I’d be more than a little interested in hearing your views.

David Harley