Tag Archives: Android

April 17th updates

Updates to Anti-Social Media 

Brian Krebs: Deleted Facebook Cybercrime Groups Had 300,000 Members – “Hours after being alerted by KrebsOnSecurity, Facebook last week deleted almost 120 private discussion groups … who flagrantly promoted a host of illicit activities on the social media network’s platform … The average age of these groups on Facebook’s platform was two years.”

Updates to Meltdown/Spectre and other chip-related resources

Note that this page’s name has now been changed to reflect the fact that it addresses a wider range of chip issues and news than Spectre and Meltdown, as witnessed by these links.

[News and general resources section]

Help Net Security: Rambus launches fully programmable secure processing core – “At RSA Conference 2018, Rambus announced the availability of the CryptoManager Root of Trust (CMRT), a fully programmable hardware security core built with a custom RISC-V CPU.”

The Register: Microsoft has designed an Arm Linux IoT cloud chip… – “Microsoft has designed a family of Arm-based system-on-chips for Internet-of-Things devices that runs its own flavor of Linux – and securely connects to an Azure-hosted backend.”

Paul Ducklin for Sophos: Could an Intel chip flaw put your whole computer at risk? – “Well, the spectre of CIH is back in the news following a recent security advisory, numbered INTEL-SA-00087, from chip maker Intel.”

Updates to (new page) Internet of (not necessarily necessary) Things

  • National Cyber Security Centre: Advisory: Russian State-Sponsored
    Cyber Actors Targeting Network Infrastructure Devices
    “Since 2015, the US and UK Governments have received information from multiple sources including private and public sector cybersecurity research organisations and allies that cyber actors are exploiting large numbers of enterprise-class and SOHO/residential routers and switches worldwide. The US and UK Governments assess that cyber actors supported by the Russian government carried out this worldwide campaign. These operations enable espionage and intellectual property that supports the Russian Federation’s national security and economic goals.”
  • Commentary from Help Net Security: US, UK warn Russians hackers are compromising networking devices worldwide

Trend Micro: Not Only Botnets: Hacking Group in Brazil Targets IoT Devices With Malware – “What is the most common internet-of-things (IoT) device across network infrastructures, whether in homes or businesses? Answer: the router.”

Updates to Mac Virus

Security Research Labs: Mind the Gap – Uncovering the Android patch gap through binary-only patch analysis (HITB conference, April 13, 2018)

Commentary by Help Net: Your Android phone says it’s fully patched, but is it really?

E Hacking News: New malware strikes panic among B’luru bank customers – “The bankers in Bengaluru claimed to have discovered a new malware that helps the hackers siphon off money from a number of bank accounts … The policemen probing the cyber crime initially talk of MazarBot, a malware, used to sent some SMS to the bank account holders’ smart phones which provides the hackers with the banking details of the accountholders.

Kaspersky: GOOGLE PLAY BOOTS THREE MALICIOUS APPS FROM MARKETPLACE TIED TO APTs

 

David Harley

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April 16th 2018 updates

Updates to Anti-Social Media 

Updates to Meltdown/Spectre – Related Resources

Bleeping Computer: Intel SPI Flash Flaw Lets Attackers Alter or Delete BIOS/UEFI Firmware

Updates to: Ransomware Resources  and Specific Ransomware Families and Types

Researchers at Princeton: Machine Learning DDoS Detection for Consumer Internet of Things Devices. “…In this paper, we demonstrate that using IoT-specific network behaviors (e.g. limited number of endpoints and regular time intervals between packets) to inform feature selection can result in high accuracy DDoS detection in IoT network traffic with a variety of machine learning algorithms, including neural networks.” Commentary from Help Net: Real-time detection of consumer IoT devices participating in DDoS attacks

Updates to Specific Ransomware Families and Types

Pierluigi Paganini: Microsoft engineer charged with money laundering linked to Reveton ransomware

Updates to Mac Virus

Mozilla: Latest Firefox for iOS Now Available with Tracking Protection by Default plus iPad Features. Commentary from Sophos: Tracking protection in Firefox for iOS now on by default – why this matters

The Register: Android apps prove a goldmine for dodgy password practices “And password crackers are getting a lot smarter…An analysis of free Android apps has shown that developers are leaving their crypto keys embedded in applications, in some cases because the software developer kits install them by default.” Summarizes research described by Will Dormann, CERT/CC software vulnerability analyst, at BSides.

David Harley

April 15th resource updates

Updates to Anti-Social Media 

The Register: Super Cali’s frickin’ whiz kids no longer oppose us: Even though Facebook thought info law was quite atrocious – “Zuck & Co end fight against California’s privacy legislation” Extra points to El Reg for the title, even if it doesn’t actually scan very well. 🙂

Sophos: Facebook shines a little light on ‘shadow profiles’ (or what Facebook knows about people who haven’t signed up to Facebook).

Also from Sophos: Interview: Sarah Jamie Lewis, Executive Director of the Open Privacy Research Society. OPRS is a privacy advocacy and research group aiming to “to make it easier for people, especially marginalized groups (including LGBT persons), to protect their privacy and anonymity online…”

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources

F5: WINDOWS IIS 6.0 CVE-2017-7269 IS TARGETED AGAIN TO MINE ELECTRONEUM – “Last year, ESET security researchers reported that the same IIS vulnerability was abused to mine Monero, and install malware to launch targeted attacks against organizations by the notorious “Lazarus” group.”

The Register: Tried checking under the sofa? Indian BTC exchange Coinsecure finds itself $3.5m lighter. “Indian Bitcoin exchange Coinsecure has mislaid 438.318 BTC belonging to its customers.”

Help Net Security: 2.5 billion crypto mining attempts detected in enterprise networks – “The volume of cryptomining transactions has been steadily growing since Coinhive came out with its browser-based cryptomining service in September 2017.” This is commentary on an earlier article from Zscaler: Cryptomining is here to stay in the enterprise.

Updates to Meltdown/Spectre – Related Resources

Help Net Security: AMD users running Windows 10 get their Spectre fix – microcode to mitigate Spectre variant 2, and a Microsoft update for Windows 10 users.

Updates to Specific Ransomware Families and Types

[14th April 2018] Bleeping Computer re PUBG (and RensenWare, a blast from the past): PUBG Ransomware Decrypts Your Files If You Play PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds, based on research from MalwareHunter. Described as a joke, but apart from the fact that such messing with a victim’s data might conceivably go horribly wrong in some circumstances – it doesn’t appear to be an impeccably well-coded program – and is likely in any case to cause the victim serious concern, it looks to me as though this is criminal activity, involving unauthorized access and modification in most jurisdictions.

Updates to Mac Virus

The Register: Exposed: Lazy Android mobe makers couldn’t care less about security  “Never. Is never a good time to get vulnerability fixes? Never is OK with you? Cool, never it is”

Graham Cluley for Bitdefender: China forces spyware onto Muslim’s Android phones, complete with security holes. Links to Adam Lynn’s report for the Open Technology Fund: App Targeting Uyghur Population Censors Content, Lacks Basic Security

Updates to Anti-Malware Testing

[14th April 2018]

Fairness and ethical testing: Pointer to a blog for ESET by Tony Anscombe: Anti-Malware testing needs standards, and testers need to adopt them “A closer look at Anti-Malware tests and the sometimes unreliable nature of the process.” A good summary, and a useful reminder of the work that AMTSO is doing, but it’s a shame that after all these years we still need to keep making these points.

David Harley

AVIEN resource updates 31st March 2018

Updates to Anti-Social Media

 (HT to Mich Kabay for pointing out the Economist articles – NB there’s a limit on how many you can view without subscribing.)

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources

Updates to Meltdown/Spectre – Related Resources

Updates to Mac Virus

(1) iOS

(2) Android

Updates to Anti-Malware Testing Blog

David Harley

Resource updates 21st March 2018

Additions to the new Anti-Social Media page:

Additions to Meltdown/Spectre – Related Resources

Resource updates 20th March 2018

[Update to Ransomware Resources page, also posted to Chain Mail Check]

If I had a separate category for ‘miscellaneous extortion’ this might belong there. Included here because it isn’t just a hoax, but one that centres on extortion, though it looks as if the point is to embarrass/harass the apparent sender of the extortion email (the Michigan company VELT)  rather than actually make a direct profit from extortion. The company’s CEO told the BBC that the attacker was probably a Minecraft player who had been banned from using the Veltpvp server, by way of revenge.

[Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources]

[Update to Tech support scams resource page]

Sophos: Fake Amazon ad ranks top on Google search results. “Yep, not for the first time, Google’s been snookered into serving a scam tech support ad posing as an Amazon ad.”

[MacVirus news]

(1) Commenting on Symantec’s warning of a new Fakebank Android variant, Graham Cluley reports: This Android malware redirects calls you make to your bank to go to scammers instead – “MALWARE HELPS SCAMMERS TRICK YOU INTO THINKING YOU’RE SPEAKING TO YOUR BANK.”

The Fakebank malware is only targeting South Korea, right now, but Graham rightly suggests that the same gambit is likely to be re-used elsewhere.

(2) Apple has dealt a major blow to users of supercookies with a security improvement in Safari.

David Harley

AV-Test Report: malware/threat statistics

AV-Test offers an interesting aggregation of 2016/2017 malware statistics in its Security Report here. Its observations on ransomware may be of particular interest to readers of this blog (how are you both?) The reports points out that:

There is no indication based on proliferation statistics that 2016 was also the “year of ransomware“. Comprising not even 1% of the overall share of malware for Windows, the blackmail Trojans appear to be more of a marginal phenomenon.

But as John Leyden remarks for The Register:

The mode of action and damage created by file-encrypting trojans makes them a much greater threat than implied by a consideration of the numbers…

Looking at the growth in malware for specific platforms, AV-Test notes a decrease in numbers for malware attacking Windows users. (Security vendors needn’t worry: there’s still plenty to go round…)

On the other hand, the report says of macOS malware that ‘With an increase rate of over 370% compared to the previous year, it is no exaggeration to speak of explosive growth.’ Of Android, it says that ‘the number of new threats … has doubled compared to the previous year.’

Of course, there’s much more in this 24-page report. To give you some idea of what, here’s the ToC:

  • The AV-TEST Security Report 2
  • WINDOWS Security Status 5
  • macOS Security Status 10
  • ANDROID Security Status 13
  • INTERNET THREATS Security Status 16
  • IoT Security Status 19
  • Test Statistics 22

David Harley

Lockdroid’s text-to-speech unlocking

Catalin Cimpanu, for Bleeping Computer, details Lockdroid’s novel use of TTS functions as part of the post-payment unlocking process: Android Ransomware Asks Victims to Speak Unlock Code. Based on a report from Symantec that I haven’t seen yet.

Lockdroid’s current campaigns appear to be focused on China, but that doesn’t mean its innovations won’t be seen elsewhere. Symantec’s Dinesh Venkatesan noted implementation bugs and that it might be possible for a victim to recover the unlock code from the phone.

David Harley

LG TV ransomware revisited

In case you were wondering what happened as regards the story I previously blogged here – Smart TV Hit by Android Ransomware – it appears that LG has decided after all to make the reset instructions for the TV public rather than requiring an LG engineer to perform the task for only twice the price of a new set… Note that this was an old model running Android, not a newer model running WebOS.

Catch-up story by David Bisson (following up on his earlier story for Metacompliance) for Graham Cluley’s blog: How to remove ransomware from your LG Smart TV – And the ransomware devs go home empty-handed!

The article quotes The Register’s article here, which details the instructions, but also links to a video on YouTube by Darren Cauthon – who originally flagged the problem – demonstrating the process.

[Also posted at Mac Virus]

David Harley

 

Android Screenlockers using pseudorandomized passcode

While I’ve been occupying various workfree zones for the past few weeks, ransomware has evidently not gone away. Older versions of screenlockers often labelled  Android.Lockscreen denied Android users access to their own devices by locking the screen using a hardcoded passcode, which could be found by reverse engineering. However, as Dinesh Venkatesan reports for Symantec:

New variants of Android.Lockscreen are using pseudorandom passcodes to prevent victims from unlocking devices without paying the ransom.

Symantec’s article: Android.Lockscreen ransomware now using pseudorandom numbers – The latest Android.Lockscreen variants are using new techniques to improve their chances of obtaining ransom money.

Commentary by David Bisson for Tripwire.

David Harley