Tag Archives: Apple

Anti-social media: at least Twitter is doing some things right…

The Register: Brit privacy watchdog reports on political data harvests: We’ve read the lot so you don’t have to – “‘Cambridge Analytica had data ferreted away on disconnected servers, Twitter actually kicked the firm’s ads off its platform, and Facebook still has a lot of questions to answer.”

Washington Post: Twitter is sweeping out fake accounts like never before, putting user growth at risk – “Twitter suspended more than 70 million accounts in May and June, and the pace has continued in July”

Sophos: Apple and Google questioned by Congress over user tracking – “Inquiring minds want to know, for one thing, whether our mobile phones are actually listening to our conversations, the committee said in a press release.

Sophos: Facebook stares down barrel of $660,000 fine over data slurping. David Bisson notes: Facebook Fined £500,000 by ICO for Cambridge Analytica Data Scandal, And Graham Cluley comments: Facebook fined a paltry £500,000 (8 minutes’ revenue) over Cambridge Analytica scandal. Quite…

Pierluigi Paganini: Timehop data breach, data from 21 million users exposed. “The company admitted that hackers obtained access credential to its cloud computing environment, that incredibly was not protected by multifactor authentication.”

David Harley

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AVIEN resource updates 8th June 2018

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources

Help Net Security: Traffic manipulation and cryptocurrency mining campaign compromised 40,000+ machines – “Unknown attackers have compromised 40,000+ servers, networking and IoT devices around the world and are using them to mine Monero and redirect traffic to websites hosting tech support scams, malicious browser extensions, and so on.”

Updates to GDPR page

James Barham of PCI Pal for Help Net: Shape up US businesses: GDPR will be coming stateside  – “European consumers have long been preoccupied by privacy which leaves us wondering why the US hasn’t yet followed suit and why it took so long for consumers to show appropriate concern? With the EU passing GDPR to address data security, will we see the US implement similar laws to address increased consumer anxiety?” And yes, Facebook gets more than one mention here.

Caleb Chen for Privacy News Online: Apple could have years of your internet browsing history; won’t necessarily give it to you – “Apple has years of your internet browsing history if you selected “sync browser tabs” in Safari. This internet history does not disappear from their servers when you click “Clear internet history” on Safari  … Additionally, the data stored and provided seems to be different for European Union based requesters versus United States based requesters. Discovering these sources of metadata is arguably one of the side effects of GDPR compliance. ”

Updates to Internet of (not necessarily necessary) Things

[Many of the Things that crop up on this page are indeed necessary – you may not be able to read this without a router. But that doesn’t mean that connecting them to the Internet of Things (or even the Internet of Everything) is necessary, or even desirable, given how often that connectivity widens the attack surface. And sometimes even necessary devices entail security risks.]

Stephen Cobb for ESET: VPNFilter update: More bad news for routers 
“New research into VPNFilter finds more devices hit by malware that’s nastier than first thought, making rebooting and remediating of routers more urgent.”

The Register: IoT CloudPets in the doghouse after damning security audit: Now Amazon bans sales “Amazon on Tuesday stopped selling CloudPets, a network-connected family of toys, in response to security and privacy concerns sounded by browser maker and internet community advocate Mozilla.” Commentary by Graham Cluley for BitDefender: Creepy CloudPets pulled from stores over security fears

Updates to Tech support scams resource page

Help Net Security: Traffic manipulation and cryptocurrency mining campaign compromised 40,000+ machines – “Unknown attackers have compromised 40,000+ servers, networking and IoT devices around the world and are using them to mine Monero and redirect traffic to websites hosting tech support scams, malicious browser extensions, and so on.”

Updates to Chain Mail Check

Tomáš Foltýn for ESET: You have NOT won! A look at fake FIFA World Cup-themed lotteries and giveaways

“With the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia just days away, fraudsters are increasingly using all things soccer as bait to reel in unsuspecting fans so that they get more than they bargained for”

Updates to Mac Virus

John E. Dunn for Sophos: Apple says no to Facebook’s tracking
“Later this year, users running the next version of Apple’s Safari browser on iOS and macOS should start seeing a new pop-up dialogue box when they visit many websites…this will ask users whether to allow or block web tracking quietly carried out by a certain co”mpany’s ‘like’, ‘share’ and comment widgets.” And the dialog text in the demo to which the article refers specifically mentions Facebook.

Caleb Chen for Privacy News Online: Apple could have years of your internet browsing history; won’t necessarily give it to you – “Apple has years of your internet browsing history if you selected “sync browser tabs” in Safari. This internet history does not disappear from their servers when you click “Clear internet history” on Safari  … Additionally, the data stored and provided seems to be different for European Union based requesters versus United States based requesters. Discovering these sources of metadata is arguably one of the side effects of GDPR compliance. ”

And from the New York Times: Facebook Gave Device Makers Deep Access to Data on Users and Friends –
“The company formed data-sharing partnerships with Apple, Samsung and
dozens of other device makers, raising new concerns about its privacy protections.” And commentary by Help Net Security: Facebook gave user data access to Chinese mobile device makers, too

David Harley

Apple on Safari, gunning for Facebook?

Updates to Anti-Social Media 

John E. Dunn for Sophos: Apple says no to Facebook’s tracking
“Later this year, users running the next version of Apple’s Safari browser on iOS and macOS should start seeing a new pop-up dialogue box when they visit many websites…this will ask users whether to allow or block web tracking quietly carried out by a certain co”mpany’s ‘like’, ‘share’ and comment widgets.” And the dialog text in the demo to which the article refers specifically mentions Facebook.

On the other hand: Caleb Chen for Privacy News Online: Apple could have years of your internet browsing history; won’t necessarily give it to you – “Apple has years of your internet browsing history if you selected “sync browser tabs” in Safari. This internet history does not disappear from their servers when you click “Clear internet history” on Safari  … Additionally, the data stored and provided seems to be different for European Union based requesters versus United States based requesters. Discovering these sources of metadata is arguably one of the side effects of GDPR compliance. ”

New York Times: Facebook Gave Device Makers Deep Access to Data on Users and Friends –
“The company formed data-sharing partnerships with Apple, Samsung and
dozens of other device makers, raising new concerns about its privacy protections.” And commentary by Help Net Security: Facebook gave user data access to Chinese mobile device makers, too

James Barham of PCI Pal for Help Net: Shape up US businesses: GDPR will be coming stateside  – “European consumers have long been preoccupied by privacy which leaves us wondering why the US hasn’t yet followed suit and why it took so long for consumers to show appropriate concern? With the EU passing GDPR to address data security, will we see the US implement similar laws to address increased consumer anxiety?” And yes, Facebook gets more than one mention here.

David Harley

Resource updates 1st April 2018

Updates to Anti-Social Media 

Updates to Meltdown/Spectre – Related Resources

Updates to Mac Virus

[Android]

Virus Bulletin paper on ‘app collusion’

Sometimes Virus Bulletin publishes papers outside its normal yearly conference cycle, and they’re always worth reading: New paper: Distinguishing between malicious app collusion and benign app collaboration: a machine-learning approach.

It’s a follow up to this conference paper: VB2016 paper: Wild Android collusions. (Which I missed at the time – I don’t often get to conferences nowadays, though I did present at VB2017 – so I’m glad of the opportunity to catch up with it.)

David Harley

Meltdown/Spectre resources

[Content now transferred to the resource page here, which I intend to expand and maintain as time allows.]

Official commentary from Apple: About speculative execution vulnerabilities in ARM-based and Intel CPUs and from Google: Today’s CPU vulnerability: what you need to know

Related Resources:

David Harley

Streamlining a Tech Support Scam

Microsoft’s Windows Security Blog on Technet: New tech support scam launches communication or phone call app

“A new tech support scam technique streamlines the entire scam experience, leaving potential victims only one click or tap away from speaking with a scammer. We recently found a new tech support scam website that opens your default communication or phone call app, automatically prompting you to call a fake tech support scam hotline.”

The scam is supplemented by an audio message from ‘Apple Support’ (yeah, right…) that threatens to ‘disable and suspend your Mac device’ if the prospective victim closes the ‘alert’ window. However, the scam is ‘optimized for mobile phones’.

Commentary from Zeljka Zorz for HelpNet: New scam launches users’ default phone app, points it to fake tech support hotline

David Harley

New Mac Malware Resource

Well, actually, it’s an old one. It’s at the Mac Virus site I kicked back into life a few months ago, primarily as a blog site.

However, I’ve been under some pressure to restore some of the features of the old Mac Virus site. While I’ll be restoring some (more) of the pre-OSX stuff for its historical interest, I don’t see that as a big priority right now. But as I’ve been talking quite a lot about Mac threats in the past month or two (see http://macviruscom.wordpress.com/2010/05/13/apple-security-snapshots-from-1997-and-2010/ for example), there’s been curiosity about what we’ve been seeing in the way of OS X malware.

Enter (stage left, with a fanfare of trumpets) the Mac Virus “Apple Malware Descriptions” Page at http://macviruscom.wordpress.com/apple-malware-descriptions/. Right now it consists of two descriptions of Mac scareware from 2008, so it’s at a very early stage of development. (It just happens to be those two descriptions because someone asked me about them yesterday.)

Isn’t this stuff available elsewhere, I hear you ask? Of course it is. The point about these descriptions is that unlike most vendor descriptions, they point to various other sources of (reasonably dependable) information, as well as including a little personal commentary. It’s a first cut at attempting to answer the question “if there’s so much Mac malware around, where is it?”

More later…

David Harley CITP FBCS CISSP
AVIEN Chief Operations Officer
Mac Virus Administrator
ESET Research Fellow and Director of Malware Intelligence

Also blogging at:
http://www.eset.com/blog
http://smallbluegreenblog.wordpress.com/
http://blogs.securiteam.com
http://blog.isc2.org/
http://dharley.wordpress.com
http://macvirus.com
http://amtso.wordpress.com/

NTEOTWAWKI

Given all the hype generated by the ridiculously titled Gawker Article about the so called ‘iPad’ hack, I’m somewhat reluctant to add to any more of the noise over what is really a pretty run of the mill story, but because I’m procrastinating on other jobs, I’ll write something. Warning: this story does involve the shocking exposure of people’s email addresses, said addresses getting revealed when they shouldn’t have been, and yes….er…well, no, that’s about it actually.

Indeed, Paul Ducklin of Sophos wrote a very nice article stating the rather important fact that, every time you send an email, that passes your email out on to the open internet. Of course, that’s not an excuse to have a poorly written web app that will spit out the email addresses of your partner company’s clientele at will. Partner company, I hear you cry, wasn’t this an Apple problem? Yes, indeed, this is absolutely nothing to do with Apple, it’s not an Apple problem, and it’s not a breach of Apple’s security, nor is it a breach of the iPad. In fact, it was solely down to a web application on AT&T’s website. It doesn’t even involve touching an iPad. But, but, you may splutter, isn’t this is an iPad disaster? No. Not even slightly; not once did the ‘attackers’ go near any one’s iPad. The ‘attack’ was purely a script  that sent ICCID numbers (this links a SIM card to an email address) to the AT&T application, in sequence, to see if their database had that number with an email attached – and if so, that came back. That’s right, it’s a SIM card identifier. The only ‘iPad’ part is that the ‘attackers’ spoofed the browser in the requests, to make the app think the request was coming from an iPad.

The upshot is that, as this page rightly points out (thanks to @securityninja for the link)

“There’s no hack, no infiltration, and no breach, just a really poorly designed web application that returns e-mail address when ICCID is passed to it.”

So, the correct title of that original Gawker article might have been “Badly designed AT&T web application leaks email addresses when given SIM card ID”, but that wouldn’t be “The End Of The World As We Know It”.

In a week where one ‘journalist’ writing here (thanks to @paperghost for the link) claimed that some security people confessing to being ‘hackers’ (whatever that means) “confirms our suspicions that the whole IT insecurity industry is a self-perpetuating cesspool populated by charlatans”, it might be time for the world of the media to turn that oh so critical eye on itself and ask who is really generating the hype in the information security world?

If you’re interested in keeping up with genuine Mac/Apple related security issues, a good resource is maintained here by my good friend David Harley

UPDATE: The original ‘attackers’ have published a response to the furore here. Pretty much confirms what I was saying

“There was no breach, intrusion, or penetration, by any means of the word.”

Andrew Lee
CEO AVIEN/CTO K7 Computing

The Register: “Welcome to the out-of-control decade”

A disquieting article by Rik Myslewski that strikes some deep chords with me. :-/

“Waiting in the wings are corporate entities eager to exploit your personal information, and government agencies watching your every step.”

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/12/31/the_out_of_control_decade/

The issue of government monitoring spends a lot of time under the spotlight, of course, and so it should. (Craig Johnston and I considered some of the law-enforcement issues in an AVAR paper this year, but there’s much more to it than that, obviously.)

http://www.eset.com/download/whitepapers/Please_Police_Me.pdf

But I’m seriously concerned about the consequences of the increasing amount of personal data (good, bad, and purely mythical) available to anyone with a browser (or even a USB port). It’s an issue I’ve had occasion to think about several times recently, and I expect to return to it a lot more in the coming months. For instance:

http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog/2009/12/14/que-sera-sera-%e2%80%93-a-buffet-of-predications-for-2010

http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog/2009/12/14/your-data-and-your-credit-card

http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog/2009/12/12/the-internet-book-of-the-dead

http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog/2009/06/09/data-protection-not-a-priority

Also, this quote from the ESET Global Threat Trends report for December: “Criminals and legitimate businesses will mine data from a widening range of resources, exploiting interoperability between social networking providers. Sharing of data in the private sector will be an increasing threat until the need is accepted for more data protection regulation on similar lines to that seen in the public sector, especially in Europe.”

David Harley FBCS CITP CISSP
Chief Operations Officer, AVIEN
Director of Malware Intelligence, ESET

Also blogging at:
http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog
http://smallbluegreenblog.wordpress.com/
http://blogs.securiteam.com
http://blog.isc2.org/
http://dharley.wordpress.com

SRI iBotnet analysis

I’m not a huge fan of SRI, mainly because of its misconceived and inept use of VirusTotal as a measure of a measure of anti-malware effectiveness. (Unfortunately, SRI is not the only organization to misuse what is actually a useful and well-designed service by Hispasec as a sort of poor man’s comparative testing, even though  Hispasec/VirusTotal themselves have been at pains to disassociate themselves from this inappropriate use of the facility: see http://blog.hispasec.com/virustotal/22.)

So it pains me slightly to report that they have actually produced a reasonable analysis of the botnet associated with the iPhone malware sometimes known as Ikee.B or Duh (sigh…) But they have, and it’s at http://mtc.sri.com/iPhone/.

I wish I could say that some of their other web content is of the same standard. Disclaimer: the company for which I currently work does indeed consistently appear at a very low position in SRI rankings, so you’d expect me to dislike the way they get their results. I do… But I dislike even more the way that they’ve ignored all my attempts to engage them on the topic. OK, rant over. The ikee analysis is still well worth a look.

David Harley FBCS CITP CISSP
Chief Operations Officer, AVIEN
Director of Malware Intelligence, ESET

Also blogging at:
http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog
http://dharley.wordpress.com/
http://blogs.securiteam.com
http://blog.isc2.org/