Tag Archives: AV-Test

IoT resource/news updates

Updates to Internet of (not necessarily necessary) Things

[Many of the Things that crop up on this page are indeed necessary. But that doesn’t mean that connecting them to the Internet of Things (or even the Internet of Everything) is necessary, or even desirable, given how often that connectivity widens the attack surface.]

(1) Brian Krebs talks about the asymmetry in cost and incentives when IoT devices are recruited for DDoS attacks like one conducted against his site: Study: Attack on KrebsOnSecurity Cost IoT Device Owners $323K.

He observes: “The attacker who wanted to clobber my site paid a few hundred dollars to rent a tiny portion of a much bigger Mirai crime machine. That attack would likely have cost millions of dollars to mitigate. The consumers in possession of the IoT devices that did the attacking probably realized a few dollars in losses each, if that. Perhaps forever unmeasured are the many Web sites and Internet users whose connection speeds are often collateral damage in DDoS attacks.”

Some of his conclusions are based on a paper from researchers at University of California, Berkeley School of Information: the very interesting report “rIoT: Quantifying Consumer Costs of Insecure Internet of Things Devices.

(2) Product test specialists AV-Test conducted research into the security of a number of fitness trackers (plus the multi-functional Apple watch: Fitness Trackers – 13 Wearables in a Security Test. On this occasion, the results are fairly encouraging.

(3) Bleeping Computer: 5,000 Routers With No Telnet Password. Nothing to See Here! Move Along! – “The researcher pointed us to one of the router’s manuals which suggests the devices come with a passwordless Telnet service by default, meaning users must configure one themselves.”

(4) Help Net Security: Hacking for fun and profit: How one researcher is making IoT device makers take security seriously  Based on research by Ken Munro and Pen Test Partners.

David Harley

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Spectre, Meltdown and Malware

Eduard Kovacs for Security Week: Malware Exploiting Spectre, Meltdown Flaws Emerges.

He observes:

Researchers have discovered more than 130 malware samples designed to exploit the recently disclosed Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities. While a majority of the samples appear to be in the testing phase, we could soon start seeing attacks.

Information from AV-Test regarding samples received from various sources (researchers, testers, security companies): the samples cover a range of platforms, not just Windows.

David Harley

AV-Test Report: malware/threat statistics

AV-Test offers an interesting aggregation of 2016/2017 malware statistics in its Security Report here. Its observations on ransomware may be of particular interest to readers of this blog (how are you both?) The reports points out that:

There is no indication based on proliferation statistics that 2016 was also the “year of ransomware“. Comprising not even 1% of the overall share of malware for Windows, the blackmail Trojans appear to be more of a marginal phenomenon.

But as John Leyden remarks for The Register:

The mode of action and damage created by file-encrypting trojans makes them a much greater threat than implied by a consideration of the numbers…

Looking at the growth in malware for specific platforms, AV-Test notes a decrease in numbers for malware attacking Windows users. (Security vendors needn’t worry: there’s still plenty to go round…)

On the other hand, the report says of macOS malware that ‘With an increase rate of over 370% compared to the previous year, it is no exaggeration to speak of explosive growth.’ Of Android, it says that ‘the number of new threats … has doubled compared to the previous year.’

Of course, there’s much more in this 24-page report. To give you some idea of what, here’s the ToC:

  • The AV-TEST Security Report 2
  • WINDOWS Security Status 5
  • macOS Security Status 10
  • ANDROID Security Status 13
  • INTERNET THREATS Security Status 16
  • IoT Security Status 19
  • Test Statistics 22

David Harley