Tag Archives: browlock

Malwarebytes on Browlock encoding

Posted on the Malwarebytes blog over a week ago, but I’ve been out of office. Still, this is definitely worth reading.

Jérôme Segura for Malwarebytes: Browlock flies under the radar with complete obfuscation – “Browlocks are the main driving force behind tech support scams, using a combination of malvertising and clever browser locker tricks to fool users.  [….] Recently we’ve seen the “evil cursor” that prevents you from closing the fake alert, and the fake virus download that insinuates your computer is already infected. This time, we look at how browser locker pages use encoding to bypass signature-based detection.”

David Harley

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Tech support scam update

Updates to Tech support scams resource page

Jérôme Segura reports (20th September 2018) for Malwarebytes on Mass WordPress compromises redirect to tech support scams. There have been high volumes of hijackings of sites using the WordPress content management system, especially sites using outdated plugins. Prominent among the client-side payloads observed by Malwarebytes are redirections to tech support scams. Segura notes that:

“That .TK URL pattern is well known and has been documented in detail as part of a large Traffic Distribution System (TDS) responsible for massive redirections to browlock pages. Note the custom mouse cursor (the “Evil cursor”), which we reported on recently, has yet to be patched.”

David Harley

Tech support scams: curse of the Evil Cursor, and Technet ads removed

Jérôme Segura for Malwarebytes: Partnerstroka: Large tech support scam operation features latest browser locker – “We have been monitoring a particular tech support scam campaign for some time which, like several others, relies on malvertising to redirect users to the well-known browser lockers (browlocks) pages. … we were still able to isolate incidents pertaining to this group which we have been tracking under the name Partnerstrokam …. and noticed that the fake alert pages contained what seemed to be a new browlock technique designed specifically for Google Chrome.”

Summary/commentary from Zeljka Zorz for Help Net: Tech support scammers leverage “evil cursor” technique to “lock” Chrome


John E. Dunn for Sophos: Microsoft purges 3,000 tech support scams hiding on TechNet – “Microsoft has taken down thousands of ads for tech support scams that had infested the company’s TechNet support domain in a sly attempt to boost their search ranking….Microsoft’s site was home to around 3,000 of these ads, mostly associated with the gallery.technet.microsoft.com downloads section.

The ads covered a wide range of fraudulent support issues, from virtual currency sites to Google Wallet and Instagram. Johnston told ZDNet…”

David Harley