Tag Archives: cryptomining

AVIEN resource updates 27th June 2018

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources

The Register: Top banker batters Bitcoin for sucky scalability, security – “Australia’s Reserve Bank sees no need for national cryptocurrencies, for now”

Sophos: Why Bitcoin’s about to give up one of its closely guarded secrets – “…the Bitcoin Core developers are finally set to unveil the not-as-secret-as-it-should-be private key that allows them to send messages to everyone on the entire Bitcoin network.”

Trend Micro: Cryptocurrency-Mining Bot Targets Devices With Running SSH Service via Potential Scam Site – “Through social engineering, users are tricked into installing the miner that directly funnels profit (in the form of Monero and Ethereum coins, in this case)…”

Updates to Internet of (not necessarily necessary) Things

[Many of the Things that crop up on this page are indeed necessary. But that doesn’t mean that connecting them to the Internet of Things (or even the Internet of Everything) is necessary, or even desirable, given how often that connectivity widens the attack surface.]

The Register: So you’re doing an IoT project. Cute. Let’s start with the basics: Security – “And for heaven’s sake, don’t fall in love with the data…Data is seen as one of IoT’s biggest payoffs – generating and gathering it to help your business. But get IoT wrong, and you stand to be overwhelmed by that data wave. Cisco estimates IoT will generate 500 zetabytes of data by the end of 2019…”

The Register: A volt out of the blue: Phone batteries reveal what you typed and read – “Power trace sniffing, a badly-designed API and some cloudy AI spell potential trouble…Both snitching and exfiltration were described in this paper (PDF), accepted for July’s Privacy Enhancing Technologies Symposium.”

Updates to Meltdown/Spectre and other chip-related resources

Ars Technica: Hyperthreading under scrutiny with new TLBleed crypto key leak – “A new attack prompted OpenBSD’s developers to disable hyperthreading by default…developers on OpenBSD—the open source operating system that prioritizes security—disabled hyperthreading on Intel processors.

The Register: Meet TLBleed: A crypto-key-leaking CPU attack that Intel reckons we shouldn’t worry about – “How to extract 256-bit keys with 99.8% success…Intel has, for now, no plans to specifically address a side-channel vulnerability in its processors that can be potentially exploited by malware to extract encryption keys and other sensitive info from applications.”

Bleeping Computer: Changes in WebAssembly Could Render Meltdown and Spectre Browser Patches Useless – “Upcoming additions to the WebAssembly standard may render useless some of the mitigations put up at the browser level against Meltdown and Spectre attacks, according to John Bergbom, a security researcher at Forcepoint. WebAssembly (WA or Wasm) is a new technology that shipped last year and is currently supported within all major browsers, such as Chrome, Edge, Firefox, and Safari.”

Updates to Mac Virus

ThreatPost: – MALICIOUS APP INFECTS 60,000 ANDROID DEVICES – BUT STILL SAVES THEIR BATTERIES – “A battery-saving app that also allows attackers to snatch text messages and read sensitive log data has been downloaded by more than 60,000 Android devices so far…“Although the app these scam pages send users to does its advertised function, it also has a nasty secret—it infects victims’ devices and comes with a side of information-stealing and ad-clicking,” Yonathan Klijnsma, threat researcher at RiskIQ, said in a post on Thursday.”

An interesting example that bears out a definition of Trojan that I’ve used for decades – “…a program that pretends to offer some useful or desirable function, and may even do so, but whose primary function is something you don’t expect it to do, and wouldn’t want it to if you did.”

David Harley

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AVIEN resource updates 8th June 2018

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources

Help Net Security: Traffic manipulation and cryptocurrency mining campaign compromised 40,000+ machines – “Unknown attackers have compromised 40,000+ servers, networking and IoT devices around the world and are using them to mine Monero and redirect traffic to websites hosting tech support scams, malicious browser extensions, and so on.”

Updates to GDPR page

James Barham of PCI Pal for Help Net: Shape up US businesses: GDPR will be coming stateside  – “European consumers have long been preoccupied by privacy which leaves us wondering why the US hasn’t yet followed suit and why it took so long for consumers to show appropriate concern? With the EU passing GDPR to address data security, will we see the US implement similar laws to address increased consumer anxiety?” And yes, Facebook gets more than one mention here.

Caleb Chen for Privacy News Online: Apple could have years of your internet browsing history; won’t necessarily give it to you – “Apple has years of your internet browsing history if you selected “sync browser tabs” in Safari. This internet history does not disappear from their servers when you click “Clear internet history” on Safari  … Additionally, the data stored and provided seems to be different for European Union based requesters versus United States based requesters. Discovering these sources of metadata is arguably one of the side effects of GDPR compliance. ”

Updates to Internet of (not necessarily necessary) Things

[Many of the Things that crop up on this page are indeed necessary – you may not be able to read this without a router. But that doesn’t mean that connecting them to the Internet of Things (or even the Internet of Everything) is necessary, or even desirable, given how often that connectivity widens the attack surface. And sometimes even necessary devices entail security risks.]

Stephen Cobb for ESET: VPNFilter update: More bad news for routers 
“New research into VPNFilter finds more devices hit by malware that’s nastier than first thought, making rebooting and remediating of routers more urgent.”

The Register: IoT CloudPets in the doghouse after damning security audit: Now Amazon bans sales “Amazon on Tuesday stopped selling CloudPets, a network-connected family of toys, in response to security and privacy concerns sounded by browser maker and internet community advocate Mozilla.” Commentary by Graham Cluley for BitDefender: Creepy CloudPets pulled from stores over security fears

Updates to Tech support scams resource page

Help Net Security: Traffic manipulation and cryptocurrency mining campaign compromised 40,000+ machines – “Unknown attackers have compromised 40,000+ servers, networking and IoT devices around the world and are using them to mine Monero and redirect traffic to websites hosting tech support scams, malicious browser extensions, and so on.”

Updates to Chain Mail Check

Tomáš Foltýn for ESET: You have NOT won! A look at fake FIFA World Cup-themed lotteries and giveaways

“With the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia just days away, fraudsters are increasingly using all things soccer as bait to reel in unsuspecting fans so that they get more than they bargained for”

Updates to Mac Virus

John E. Dunn for Sophos: Apple says no to Facebook’s tracking
“Later this year, users running the next version of Apple’s Safari browser on iOS and macOS should start seeing a new pop-up dialogue box when they visit many websites…this will ask users whether to allow or block web tracking quietly carried out by a certain co”mpany’s ‘like’, ‘share’ and comment widgets.” And the dialog text in the demo to which the article refers specifically mentions Facebook.

Caleb Chen for Privacy News Online: Apple could have years of your internet browsing history; won’t necessarily give it to you – “Apple has years of your internet browsing history if you selected “sync browser tabs” in Safari. This internet history does not disappear from their servers when you click “Clear internet history” on Safari  … Additionally, the data stored and provided seems to be different for European Union based requesters versus United States based requesters. Discovering these sources of metadata is arguably one of the side effects of GDPR compliance. ”

And from the New York Times: Facebook Gave Device Makers Deep Access to Data on Users and Friends –
“The company formed data-sharing partnerships with Apple, Samsung and
dozens of other device makers, raising new concerns about its privacy protections.” And commentary by Help Net Security: Facebook gave user data access to Chinese mobile device makers, too

David Harley

3rd May AVIEN resources updates

Updates to Anti-Social Media 

Kaspersky Threat Post: TENS OF THOUSANDS OF MALICIOUS APPS USING FACEBOOK APIS – “At least 25,936 malicious apps are currently using one of Facebook’s APIs, such as a login API or messaging API. These allow apps to access a range of information from Facebook profiles, like name, location and email address.”

The Register:

Talking of Zuckerberg, here’s his summary of the forthcoming ‘Clear History’ control.

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources

Catalin Cimpanu for Bleeping Computer: New MassMiner Malware Targets Web Servers With an Assortment of Exploits

The Register: Whoa, Gartner drops a truth bomb: Blockchain is overhyped and top IT bods don’t want it – “Didn’t you know it’s panacea to all corporate woes, bro?!”

Gad Naveh for Help Net: Dig this: The future of crypto-mining botnets

Trend Micro: Cryptocurrency-Mining Malware Targeting IoT, Being Offered in the Underground

Updates to Meltdown/Spectre and other chip-related resources

Hilbert Hagedoorn for The Guru of 3-D: Eight new Spectre Variant Vulnerabilities for Intel Discovered – four of them critical

The Register: Hands off! Arm pitches tamper-resistant Cortex-M35-P CPU cores – “Sneaky processors look to keep lid on sensitive IoT data”

ESET: further updates to Meltdown and Spectre CPU Vulnerabilities: What You Need to Know

Updates to Internet of (not necessarily necessary) Things

The Register: Hands off! Arm pitches tamper-resistant Cortex-M35-P CPU cores – “Sneaky processors look to keep lid on sensitive IoT data”

Trend Micro: Cryptocurrency-Mining Malware Targeting IoT, Being Offered in the Underground

Sophos:

Richi Jennings for Tech Beacon: VW bugs: “Unpatchable” remote code pwnage – “Two security researchers have excoriated Volkswagen Group for selling insecure cars. As in: hackable-over-the-internet insecure.”

Updates to Specific Ransomware Families and Types

Paul Ducklin for Sophos: “SamSam” ransomware – a mean old dog with a nasty new trick

David Harley

April 23rd resources updates

Updates to Anti-Social Media 

Hacker News: Flaw in LinkedIn AutoFill Plugin Lets Third-Party Sites Steal Your Data. Summarizes Jack Cable’s article LinkedIn AutoFill Exposed Visitor Name, Email to Third-Party Websites.

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources

360 Core Security: Attackers Fake Computational Power to Steal Cryptocurrencies from Mining Pools “Recently, we detected a new type of attack which targets some equihash mining pools.”

Updates to Meltdown/Spectre and other chip-related resources

Security Explorations: THE ORIGIN AND IMPACT OF SECURITY VULNERABILITIES IN ST CHIPSETS
SE-2011-01 [Security weaknesses in a digital satellite TV platform]

Updates to Internet of (not necessarily necessary) Things

Security Explorations: THE ORIGIN AND IMPACT OF SECURITY VULNERABILITIES IN ST CHIPSETS
SE-2011-01 [Security weaknesses in a digital satellite TV platform]

Updates to Specific Ransomware Families and Types

Bart Blaze: Satan ransomware adds EternalBlue exploit

Updates to Chain Mail Check

Updated 2010 article Corpus Christi Hoax in the light of new information via a comment to an ESET article.

David Harley