Tag Archives: GDPR

AVIEN, Chainmailcheck, & MacVirus updates

Updates to Anti-Social Media 

ESET: Tumblr patches bug that could have exposed user data
The microblogging platform is assuring its users that has found no evidence that any data was actually stolen

The Register: Tumblr turns stumblr, left humblr: Blogging biz blogs bloggers’ private info to world+dog – “Tumblr today reveal it has fixed a security bug in its website that quietly revealed private details of some of its bloggers”


The Next Web: Twitter releases 10M Iranian and Russian propaganda tweets ahead of US Midterms – “Twitter yesterday released a bevy of data related to Iranian and Russian-sponsored misinformation campaigns started as long ago as 2009. The hope, in releasing the trove, is that academics and researchers will use it to come up with solutions to the propaganda problem plaguing US politics.”

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources

Bleeping Computer: Researcher Livestreams 51% Attack on Altcoin Blockchain – “A little over a week ago, researcher promised to run a 51% attack on the blockchain of a small cryptocurrency called Einsteinium (EMC2), to show the world how easy the entire process was.”

Updates to GDPR page

ZDNet: Apple to US users: Here’s how you can now see what personal data we hold on you – “Apple’s privacy tools now go beyond Europe, so more now get to download the personal data it has collected….he move brings the four countries in line with Europe, where Apple began offering a simpler way to download a copy of user data in May, just before the EU’s strict GDPR privacy legislation came into effect.”

Updates to Meltdown/Spectre and other chip-related resources

The Register: Decoding the Google Titan, Titan, and Titan M – that last one is the Pixel 3’s security chip – “Chocolate Factory opens lid, just a little, on secure boot and crypto phone coprocessor”

Updates to Specific Ransomware Families and Types

Bleeping Computer: GandCrab Devs Release Decryption Keys for Syrian Victims – “After seeing this tweet, the GandCrab developers posted on a forum that they have released the keys for all Syrian victims. They also stated that it was a mistake that Syria was not added to the original list of countries that GandCrab would not encrypt, but did not say if they would be added going forward.”

Updates to Chain Mail Check

Recognizing scams

Updates to Mac Virus

Apple and personal data, plus Android issues

David Harley

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AVIEN resources update 10th October 2018

Updates to Anti-Social Media 

Catalin Cimpanu for ZDnet: Google sets new rules for third-party apps to access Gmail data – “All Gmail third-party apps with full access to Gmail user data will need to re-submit for a review by February 15, 2019, or be removed.” Meanwhile, according to the Hacker News: Google+ is Shutting Down After a Vulnerability Exposed 500,000 Users’ Data.

“The vulnerability was open since 2015 and fixed after Google discovered it in March 2018, but the company chose not to disclose the breach to the public—at the time when Facebook was being roasted for Cambridge Analytica scandal.”

The Register comments: Google now minus Google Plus: Social mini-network faces axe in data leak bug drama – “Project Zero would have been all over this – yet it remained under wraps”


Pierluigi Paganani: Hackers can compromise your WhatsApp account by tricking you into answering a video call

The Register:  Rap for WhatsApp chat app chaps in phone-to-pwn security nap flap – “Memory corruption flaw present in Android, iOS builds. Aaand it’s been fixed”

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources

Cecilia Pastorino for ESET: Blockchain: What is it, how it works and how it is being used in the market – “A closer look at the technology that is rapidly growing in popularity”


Help Net, citing a report by Webroot: Cryptomining dethrones ransomware as top threat in 2018

Updates to GDPR page

Amber Welch for Security Boulevard: Phishing the GDPR Data Subject Rights – “Companies across the globe are now working toward compliance with the EU GDPR, while phishers may be preparing to exploit their new compliance processes. Airbnb first fell prey to a GDPR-related scam, with more surely to come. Unfortunately, many GDPR security efforts have focused primarily on Article 32 while overlooking new ancillary compliance program risks.”

Updates to Internet of (not necessarily necessary) Things

[Many of the Things that crop up on this page are indeed necessary. But that doesn’t mean that connecting them to the Internet of Things (or even the Internet of Everything) is necessary, or even desirable, given how often that connectivity widens the attack surface.]

SEC Consult: MILLIONS OF XIONGMAI VIDEO SURVEILLANCE DEVICES CAN BE HACKED VIA CLOUD FEATURE (XMEYE P2P CLOUD)

Shaun Nichols for The Register: World’s largest CCTV maker leaves at least 9 million cameras open to public viewing – “Xiongmai’s cloud portal opens sneaky backdoor into servers….Yet another IoT device vendor has been found to be exposing their products to attackers with basic security lapses.”


Netlab 360: 70+ different types of home routers(all together 100,000+) are being hijacked by GhostDNS – “Just like the regular dnschanger, this campaign attempts to guess the password on the router’s web authentication page or bypass the authentication through the dnscfg.cgi exploit, then changes the router’s default DNS address to the Rogue DNS Server[3]through the corresponding DNS configuration interface.”

Tomáš Foltýn for ESET: Most routers full of firmware flaws that leave users at risk
– “If you own a Wi-Fi router, it may well be riddled with security holes that expose you to a host of threats” There’s a comment to this piece by TrevorX that’s well worth reading.


The Register: Which? That smart home camera? The one with the vulns? Really? – “Which? Magazine has been called out for recommending a line of smart home cameras with known vulnerabilities.”


Pierluigi Paganini: Expert presented a new attack technique to compromise MikroTik Routers – “The experts at Tenable Research presented the technique on October 7 at DerbyCon 8.0 during the talk “Bug Hunting in RouterOS” at Derbycon, it leverages a known directory traversal flaw tracked as CVE-2018-14847.”

Updates to Meltdown/Spectre and other chip-related resources

Thomas Claburn for The Register: Intel’s commitment to making its stuff secure is called into question – ‘In an email to The Register in response to our report about the problems posed by the Manufacturing Mode in Intel’s Management Engine (ME), which if left open leaves processors vulnerable to local attack, Kanthak called Intel’s statement “a blatant lie.”‘

Updates to: Ransomware Resources

Help Net, citing a report by Webroot: Cryptomining dethrones ransomware as top threat in 2018

Updates to Tech support scams resource page

Probably won’t get to be a full post, but a comment on one of my ESET blog articles pointed out that “A similar variation is still going round starting with the assertion that your broadband speed is below par and he was working on behalf of my ISP. When we got as far as typing “assoc” in the command window I looked for proof of identification (which I should have asked for at the start!). As tempers flared I hung up the line.”

Updates to Mac Virus

More commentary on China, Apple, and supply-chain hacking

Android, iOS, and macOS issues

 

David Harley

September 19th 2018 Updates

Updates to Anti-Social Media 

Danny Bradbury for Sophos: Deepfake pics and videos set off Facebook’s fake news detector Centres on FB’s announcement that “To date, most of our fact-checking partners have focused on reviewing articles. However, we have also been actively working to build new technology and partnerships so that we can tackle other forms of misinformation. Today, we’re expanding fact-checking for photos and videos to all of our 27 partners in 17 countries around the world (and are regularly on-boarding new fact-checking partners). This will help us identify and take action against more types of misinformation, faster.”

The Register: Not so much changing their tune as enabling autotune: Facebook, Twitter bigwigs nod and smile to US senators – “Google slammed for no-show”


Graham Cluley: Twitter testing new feature that reveals when you’re online – “WHO OTHER THAN STALKERS ACTUALLY WANTS THIS?”


Lisa Vaas for Sophos: Review that! Fake TripAdvisor review peddler sent to jail

“The owner of a fake-review factory is going to get a chance to write a review about his trip to the inside of an Italian jail.

TripAdvisor announced (PDF) on Wednesday that, in one of the first cases of its kind, the criminal court of the Italian city of Lecce has ruled that writing fake reviews, under a fake identity, is criminal conduct.”


Michigan News (University of Michigan): Fake news detector algorithm works better than a human – “ANN ARBOR—An algorithm-based system that identifies telltale linguistic cues in fake news stories could provide news aggregator and social media sites like Google News with a new weapon in the fight against misinformation.

The University of Michigan researchers who developed the system have demonstrated that it’s comparable to and sometimes better than humans at correctly identifying fake news stories.”

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources

Palo Alto: Xbash Combines Botnet, Ransomware, Coinmining in Worm that Targets Linux and Windows – “Unit 42 researchers have found a new malware family that is targeting Linux and Microsoft Windows servers that we have named XBash. We can tie this malware to the Iron Group, a threat actor group known for ransomware attacks in the past.”


Tomáš Foltýn for ESET: One in three UK orgs hit by cryptojacking in previous month, survey finds – “Conversely, only a little over one-third of IT executives believe that their systems have never been hijacked to surreptitiously mine digital currencies”


Trend Micro took a little time out from snarfing customer data to issue a report that tells us of “a noticeable shift away from highly visible ransomware to a more discreet detection: cryptocurrency mining. Unseen Threats, Imminent Losses Phil Muncaster notes, based on that report, that Cryptomining Malware Soars 956% in a Year and also cites a report from Checkpoint which “warned last month that the number of global organizations affected by cryptojacking rose from just under 21% in the second half of 2017 to 42% in 1H 2018, with cyber-criminals making an estimated $2.5bn over the past six months.”


Graham Cluley: Cryptominers killing cryptominers to squeeze more out of your CPU

“As security researcher Xavier Mertens describes, a newly-encountered malicious miner for the Monero cryptocurrency is working hard to kill any potential competitors it encounters for system resources, using an ever-expanding list.”


Kaspars Osis for ESET: Kodi add-ons launch cryptomining campaign – “ESET researchers have discovered several third-party add-ons for the popular open-source media player Kodi being used to distribute Linux and Windows cryptocurrency-mining malware”

Commentary from Bleeping Computer: Malicious Kodi Add-ons Install Windows & Linux Coin Mining Trojans – “Security researchers discovered a campaign that infects machines running Kodi via a legitimate add-on that has been altered by cybercriminals looking to mine the onero cryptocurrency with the resources of Kodi users.”


Danny Bradbury for Sophos: Blockchain hustler beats the house with smart contract hack – “A wily hacker has scored a thousand dollar cryptocurrency jackpot … by using their own code to tamper with a smart contract run by a betting company on the EOS blockchain …. Unlike Bitcoin, which uses a blockchain to record the transfer of digital currency, EOS and Ethereum both enable people to run computer programs. These programs are called smart contracts, and instead of running in one place they run on many computers connected to the blockchain.” Fascinating article.

Updates to GDPR page

Veronika Gallisova for ESET: 100 days of GDPR – “What impact has the new data protection directive had on businesses so far?”

Updates to Internet of (not necessarily necessary) Things

[Many of the Things that crop up on this page are indeed necessary. But that doesn’t mean that connecting them to the Internet of Things (or even the Internet of Everything) is necessary, or even desirable, given how often that connectivity widens the attack surface.]

John Leyden for The Register: 2-bit punks’ weak 40-bit crypto didn’t help Tesla keyless fobs one bit – “Eggheads demo how to clone gizmo, nick flash motor in seconds – flaw now patched”

“Researchers from the Computer Security and Industrial Cryptography (COSIC) group – part of the Department of Electrical Engineering at Belgian university KU Leuven – were able to clone a key fob, open the doors, and drive away the electric sports car.”


The Register: Mikrotik routers pwned en masse, send network data to mysterious box – “Researchers uncover botnet malware pouncing on security holes”


The Register: Thousands of misconfigured 3D printers on interwebz run risk of sabotage

“Internet-connected 3D printers are at risk of being tampered with or even sabotaged because users fail to apply security controls, a researcher has warned.”


The Register: M-M-M-MONSTER KILL: Cisco’s bug-wranglers swat 29 in single week – “If you’re running the end-of-life RV110 Wireless-N VPN firewall or RV215W Wireless-N VPN router, bad news: some of their security vulnerabilities won’t be patched and there’s no workaround – so it is probably time to replace them.”


Tomáš Foltýn for ESET: Could home appliances knock down power grids? –  “The researchers tested the plausibility of the new type of attack on “state-of-the-art simulators on real-world power grid models”. The threat is described in a paper called “BlackIoT: IoT Botnet of High Wattage Devices Can Disrupt the Power Grid”, and the research was also presented at a recent USENIX security symposium.”

Updates to: Ransomware Resources

Mark Stockley for Sophos: The rise of targeted ransomware

“While cryptomining and cryptojacking have been sucking all the air out of the press room, a snowball that started rolling well before anyone had ever heard of WannaCry has been gathering pace and size.

The snowball is a trend for stealthier and more sophisticated ransomware attacks – attacks that are individually more lucrative, harder to stop and more devastating for their victims than attacks that rely on email or exploits to spread.”

Updates to Specific Ransomware Families and Types

John Leyden for The Register: Sextortion scum armed with leaked credentials are persistent pests – “If you’re going to batter 8,497 folk with over 60,000 threats, odds are someone will crack”

Bleeping Computer: Barack Obama’s Blackmail Virus Ransomware Only Encrypts .EXE Files – “It is unknown how this ransomware is distributed or if the developer will even provide a decryption key if paid. ”

Updates to Mac Virus

Dangers on Safari – The Safari Reaper attack, and URL spoofing

Android Issues – Android Malware-as-a-Service botnet, CVE-2018-9489, and open-source vulnerabilities in Android apps.

Smartphones that talk too much acoustic side-channel attacks

Flushing the Mac App Store  Ad-Doctor and three Trend apps removed

Apple to make life easier for law enforcement – portal to apply for access to information and training

Krebs: commentary on global authentication via your wireless carrier – what could go wrong?

David Harley

August 22nd resources update

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources

Next Web: Arrested BitConnect kingpin is connected to yet another cryptocurrency scam – “Something is cooking up in the Indian state of Gujarat”

Updates to GDPR page

Catalin Cimpanu for Bleeping Computer: Number of Third-Party Cookies on EU News Sites Dropped by 22% Post-GDPR  “Researchers looked at 200 news sites in total, from seven countries —Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain, and the UK.” Sadly, there seem to be an awful lot of sites outside the EU that regard GDPR as avoidable simply by saying “We use cookies: live with it or live without us.” Sigh…

The Register takes a slightly broader view: That’s the way the cookies crumble: Consent banners up 16% since GDPR – “While news sites cut cookies by 22% – but Google retains omnipresence”

Updates to Meltdown/Spectre and other chip-related resources

Foreshadow web page resource:


The Register: Fix for July’s Spectre-like bug is breaking some supers – “RDMA-Lustre combo swatted, HPC admins scramble”

Updates to Specific Ransomware Families and Types

GandGrab:

Trend Micro: .EGG Files in Spam Delivers GandCrab v4.3 Ransomware to South Korean Users Apparently the otherwise obscure .EGG file compression format is widely used in South Korea.

Commentary by Graham Cluley: Rotten EGGs spread ransomware in South Korea – “RANSOMWARE CHANGES FILE EXTENSION TO .KRAB.”

Commentary by David Bisson for Tripwire: Spam Campaign Targeting South Korean Users With GandCrab v4.3 Ransomware


Ryuk:

Catalin Cimpanu for Bleeping Computer: Ryuk Ransomware Crew Makes $640,000 in Recent Activity Surge – “There have been several reports from victims regarding infections with Ryuk in the past week, including one on the Bleeping Computer forums.”

David Harley

Updates to the ‘(Anti-)social media’ page

Tomáš Foltýn for ESET: How (over)sharing on social media can trip you up. In case you’d forgotten just how many ways there are in which oversharing information can harm you…

The Register: Facebook shells out $8k bug bounty after quiz web app used by 120m people spews profiles – “Facebook has forked out an $8,000 reward after a security researcher flagged up a third-party web app that potentially exposed up to 120 million people’s personal information from their Facebook profiles.” In case you thought Facebook was past all that…

Maria Varmazis for Sophos: Are you happy with this technology that Facebook’s developing? – actually commentary on a story in the New York Times about what Facebook’s patent applications tell us. It seems that there are few aspects of our personal lives that Facebook isn’t  interested in tracking.  Though Maria rightly points out that “these patents are not a product roadmap for Facebook, so it is entirely possible we’ll never see them in action.” Unless, perhaps, FB is encouraged to pursue them by future commercial and political developments…

Also from Sophos:

Facebook and Google accused of manipulating us with “dark patterns” – “In a report called Deceived By Design, the Norwegian Consumer Council (Forbrukerrådet) calls out Facebook and Google for presenting their GDPR privacy options in manipulative ways that encourage users to give up their privacy.” However, there are lots of more blatant manipulations to be seen: in many cases, it’s just a case of ‘let us drop our cookies or miss out on what we’re offering.”

David Harley

AVIEN resource updates 8th June 2018

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources

Help Net Security: Traffic manipulation and cryptocurrency mining campaign compromised 40,000+ machines – “Unknown attackers have compromised 40,000+ servers, networking and IoT devices around the world and are using them to mine Monero and redirect traffic to websites hosting tech support scams, malicious browser extensions, and so on.”

Updates to GDPR page

James Barham of PCI Pal for Help Net: Shape up US businesses: GDPR will be coming stateside  – “European consumers have long been preoccupied by privacy which leaves us wondering why the US hasn’t yet followed suit and why it took so long for consumers to show appropriate concern? With the EU passing GDPR to address data security, will we see the US implement similar laws to address increased consumer anxiety?” And yes, Facebook gets more than one mention here.

Caleb Chen for Privacy News Online: Apple could have years of your internet browsing history; won’t necessarily give it to you – “Apple has years of your internet browsing history if you selected “sync browser tabs” in Safari. This internet history does not disappear from their servers when you click “Clear internet history” on Safari  … Additionally, the data stored and provided seems to be different for European Union based requesters versus United States based requesters. Discovering these sources of metadata is arguably one of the side effects of GDPR compliance. ”

Updates to Internet of (not necessarily necessary) Things

[Many of the Things that crop up on this page are indeed necessary – you may not be able to read this without a router. But that doesn’t mean that connecting them to the Internet of Things (or even the Internet of Everything) is necessary, or even desirable, given how often that connectivity widens the attack surface. And sometimes even necessary devices entail security risks.]

Stephen Cobb for ESET: VPNFilter update: More bad news for routers 
“New research into VPNFilter finds more devices hit by malware that’s nastier than first thought, making rebooting and remediating of routers more urgent.”

The Register: IoT CloudPets in the doghouse after damning security audit: Now Amazon bans sales “Amazon on Tuesday stopped selling CloudPets, a network-connected family of toys, in response to security and privacy concerns sounded by browser maker and internet community advocate Mozilla.” Commentary by Graham Cluley for BitDefender: Creepy CloudPets pulled from stores over security fears

Updates to Tech support scams resource page

Help Net Security: Traffic manipulation and cryptocurrency mining campaign compromised 40,000+ machines – “Unknown attackers have compromised 40,000+ servers, networking and IoT devices around the world and are using them to mine Monero and redirect traffic to websites hosting tech support scams, malicious browser extensions, and so on.”

Updates to Chain Mail Check

Tomáš Foltýn for ESET: You have NOT won! A look at fake FIFA World Cup-themed lotteries and giveaways

“With the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia just days away, fraudsters are increasingly using all things soccer as bait to reel in unsuspecting fans so that they get more than they bargained for”

Updates to Mac Virus

John E. Dunn for Sophos: Apple says no to Facebook’s tracking
“Later this year, users running the next version of Apple’s Safari browser on iOS and macOS should start seeing a new pop-up dialogue box when they visit many websites…this will ask users whether to allow or block web tracking quietly carried out by a certain co”mpany’s ‘like’, ‘share’ and comment widgets.” And the dialog text in the demo to which the article refers specifically mentions Facebook.

Caleb Chen for Privacy News Online: Apple could have years of your internet browsing history; won’t necessarily give it to you – “Apple has years of your internet browsing history if you selected “sync browser tabs” in Safari. This internet history does not disappear from their servers when you click “Clear internet history” on Safari  … Additionally, the data stored and provided seems to be different for European Union based requesters versus United States based requesters. Discovering these sources of metadata is arguably one of the side effects of GDPR compliance. ”

And from the New York Times: Facebook Gave Device Makers Deep Access to Data on Users and Friends –
“The company formed data-sharing partnerships with Apple, Samsung and
dozens of other device makers, raising new concerns about its privacy protections.” And commentary by Help Net Security: Facebook gave user data access to Chinese mobile device makers, too

David Harley

Apple on Safari, gunning for Facebook?

Updates to Anti-Social Media 

John E. Dunn for Sophos: Apple says no to Facebook’s tracking
“Later this year, users running the next version of Apple’s Safari browser on iOS and macOS should start seeing a new pop-up dialogue box when they visit many websites…this will ask users whether to allow or block web tracking quietly carried out by a certain co”mpany’s ‘like’, ‘share’ and comment widgets.” And the dialog text in the demo to which the article refers specifically mentions Facebook.

On the other hand: Caleb Chen for Privacy News Online: Apple could have years of your internet browsing history; won’t necessarily give it to you – “Apple has years of your internet browsing history if you selected “sync browser tabs” in Safari. This internet history does not disappear from their servers when you click “Clear internet history” on Safari  … Additionally, the data stored and provided seems to be different for European Union based requesters versus United States based requesters. Discovering these sources of metadata is arguably one of the side effects of GDPR compliance. ”

New York Times: Facebook Gave Device Makers Deep Access to Data on Users and Friends –
“The company formed data-sharing partnerships with Apple, Samsung and
dozens of other device makers, raising new concerns about its privacy protections.” And commentary by Help Net Security: Facebook gave user data access to Chinese mobile device makers, too

James Barham of PCI Pal for Help Net: Shape up US businesses: GDPR will be coming stateside  – “European consumers have long been preoccupied by privacy which leaves us wondering why the US hasn’t yet followed suit and why it took so long for consumers to show appropriate concern? With the EU passing GDPR to address data security, will we see the US implement similar laws to address increased consumer anxiety?” And yes, Facebook gets more than one mention here.

David Harley

June 1st AVIEN resources updates

Updates to (Anti)Social Media

Tomáš Foltýn for ESET: More curious, less cautious: Protecting kids online – “How we can help protect a generation for which digital is the way of the world?”

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources

Trend Micro: Rig Exploit Kit Now Using CVE-2018-8174 to Deliver Monero Miner

Updates to GDPR page

For Tech Beacon, Richi Jennings curates some blog-y thoughts on GDPR and what comes next from the EU: Think GDPR was a disaster? EU’s ePrivacy Regulation is worse

Milena Dimitrova for Security Boulevard: GDPR Is Affecting the Way WHOIS Works, Security Researchers Worry – as indeed it is, and indeed they should…

Graham Cluley: An advert against online privacy “NO, YOU CAN TAKE ANYTHING… JUST DON’T TAKE MY APPS!” – “The advertising industry … has its knickers in a twist so tightly about European privacy regulations that it made videos like this to try to sway public opinion”

For Help Net, Arcserve’s Oussama El-Hilali discusses The emergence and impact of the Data Protection Officer. Not a bad article, but extraordinarily US-centric in its assertion that “… one of the lesser known mandates of the regulation is the creation of a completely new role: The Data Protection Officer (DPO).” That role, if not necessarily that job title, has long been known in Europe and the UK as a direct result of the Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC, which it supersedes and the UK’s Data Protection Act(s).

Sophos:  European Commission “doesn’t plan to comply with GDPR” – well, sort of

Updates to Meltdown/Spectre and other chip-related resources

The Register: Arm emits Cortex-A76 – its first 64-bit-only CPU core (in kernel mode) – “Apps, 32 or 64-bit, will continue to run just fine as design biz looks to ditch baggage … Linux and Android, Windows, and other operating systems built for this latest Cortex-A family member are being positioned, or are already positioned, to work within this 64-bit-only zone.”

Also from The Register: Spectre-protectors: If there’s something strange in your CPU, who you gonna call? “Ghostbusters in Chrome 67 stop Spectre cross-tab sniffs and more … Enhanced Spectre-protectors will soon come to the Chrome browser … and upgrades for Windows, Mac and Linux have started to flow.”

Updates to Internet of (not necessarily necessary) Things

Dearbytes: Smartwatches disclosing children’s location

The Register: OMG, that’s downright Wicked: Botnet authors twist corpse of Mirai into new threats – “Infamous IoT menace lives on in its hellspawn”. Summarizes Netscout’s research – OMG – Mirai Minions are Wicked – “In this blog post we’ll delve into four Mirai variants; Satori, JenX, OMG and Wicked, in which the authors have built upon Mirai and added their own flair.”

Updates to Specific Ransomware Families and Types

Bleeping Computer: New Backup Cryptomix Ransomware Variant Actively Infecting Users

Updates to Mac Virus

John Gruber for Daring Fireball: 10 Strikes and You’re Out – the iOS Feature You’re Probably Not Using But Should. The feature he’s referring to is the passcode option “Erase all data on this iPhone after 10 failed passcode attempts”. I don’t have an iPhone, so haven’t really looked into the feature, but it certainly seems that it’s a more useful, less daunting option than you might think.

Paul Ducklin for Sophos: Apple’s iOS 11.4 security update arrives in an iCloud of silence – “We updated to iOS 11.4, because that’s our habit – but Apple still isn’t saying what was fixed yet. How we wish Apple wouldn’t do that!”

Updates to Chain Mail Check

Tomáš Foltýn for ESET: World Cup scams: how to avoid an own goal – “Whether travelling to enjoy the matches in person, or watching from home, fans should be on the lookout for foul play” (I always enjoy Tomáš’s wordplay.)

Snopes: Is Starbucks Installing ‘Shatter-Proof Windows’? – “An image circulating online falsely promised “free coffee for a year” to anyone who could damage the company’s new windows.” Put away that bazooka…

David Harley

May 30th updates

Updates to Anti-Social Media 

Sophos: Facebook battles tiny startup over privacy accusations John E. Dunn remarks:

“You can argue Six4Three’s allegations either way … they’re another example of the way the company perfectly understood the value of its user data and wanted to monetise it.”

“Alternatively, by restricting third parties, Facebook was simply reigning in risky access that privacy advocates believe should never have been allowed in the first place.”

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources

ESET: UNICEF now using cryptocurrency mining for fundraising – “So far in 2018, the NGO has launched two charity campaigns with the aim of raising funds through cryptocurrency mining.”

Technode: Qihoo 360 discovers high-risk security issues in EOS, says 80% digital wallets have problems – “Blockchain platform EOS is facing a series of high-risk security vulnerabilities, according to Chinese cybersecurity company Qihoo 360 […] EOS is a blockchain-based, decentralized system that enables the development, hosting, and execution of commercial-scale decentralized applications (dApps) on its platform.”

Updates to GDPR page

The Register: Businesses brace themselves for a kicking as GDPR blows in – “Securing company data just got even harder”

Updates to Internet of (not necessarily necessary) Things

The Register: Softbank’s ‘Pepper’ robot is a security joke – “Big-in-Japan ‘bot offers root access through hard-coded password and worse bugs too”

Sophos: California tests digital license plates. Is tracking cars next? –  Lisa Vaas comments: ‘Yes, now we can add license plates to the pile of “do we really need xyz IoT thing,” which already includes internet-enabled fridges, toasters, washing machines and coffee makers.’ And mentions quite a few of the issues that this initiative raises. What could go wrong?

Updates to MELTDOWN/SPECTRE AND OTHER CHIP-RELATED RESOURCES

Interesting paper: Post-Spectre Threat Model Re-Think

Updates to Mac Virus

(1) Bleeping Computer: Malware Found in the Firmware of 141 Low-Cost Android Devices – “Two years after being outed, a criminal operation that has been inserting malware in the firmware of low-cost Android devices is still up and running, and has even expanded its reach.” 

Dr Web report from 2016: Doctor Web discovers Trojans in firmware of well-known Android mobile devices – “Doctor Web’s security researchers found new Trojans incorporated into firmwares of several dozens of Android mobile devices. Found malware programs are stored in system catalogs and covertly download and install programs.”

Avast report from 24th May 2018: Android devices ship with pre-installed malware – “The Avast Threat Labs has found adware pre-installed on several hundred different Android device models and versions, including devices from manufacturers like ZTE and Archos. The majority of these devices are not certified by Google.”

(2) Meanwhile, Sophos’ Matt Boddy has been looking at how to find out the answer to the question Are your Android apps sending unencrypted data? He says:

“My concerns led me to do some network analysis on popular Android apps, following the methodology set out in the OWASP Mobile Security Testing Guide.

I’ll tell you what I did, what I discovered and how you can do it too.”

Updates to Anti-Malware Testing

AMTSO has issued press releases – AMTSO Membership Approves Major Step Forward in Testing Standards and AMTSO Announces Full Adoption of Testing Protocol Standard following the approval by a majority of AMTSO members of its Draft Standards and authorization of a working group at the recent AMTSO meeting.

No information at present on exactly how the voting went, which I’d like to have seen in the interests of transparency.

David Harley

Updates: Facebook, AggregateIQ, and some ransomware resources

Updates to Anti-Social Media 

[4th/5th April 2018]

Updates to: Ransomware Resources

[4th/5th April 2018]

David Harley