Tag Archives: NotPetya

AVIEN resource updates 27th June 2018 (continued)

Updates to Anti-Social Media 

Metro: Facebook wants to hide secret inaudible messages in TV ads that can force your phone to record audio – this is so blatant I find it hard to believe, despite my own distrust of Zuckerberg and his minions. But I suppose we’ll see.

Updates to Internet of (not necessarily necessary) Things

[Many of the Things that crop up on this page are indeed necessary. But that doesn’t mean that connecting them to the Internet of Things (or even the Internet of Everything) is necessary, or even desirable, given how often that connectivity widens the attack surface.]

Help Net: GlobalSign launches IoT Identity Platform addressing IoT device security requirements

Updates to Specific Ransomware Families and Types

Talos: Files Cannot Be Decrypted? Challenge Accepted. Talos Releases ThanatosDecryptor – “Additionally, due to issues present within the encryption process leveraged by this ransomware, the malware authors are unable to return the data to the victim, even if he or she pays the ransom. While previous reports seem to indicate this is accidental, specific campaigns appear to demonstrate that in some cases, this is intentional on the part of the distributor.”

John Leyden for The Register: A year after devastating NotPetya outbreak, what have we learnt? Er, not a lot, says BlackBerry bod – “Say it with me: ‘Patch outdated systems.’ Good, and again…”

David Harley

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Ransomware/Wiper-related updates

Updates to: Ransomware Resources

Help Net Security: Organisations across the UK are still struggling with ransomware

F-Secure: The Changing State of Ransomware

Updates to Specific Ransomware Families and Types

In response to this useful article by Kaspersky, this page now includes information on wipers, which often resemble or masquerade as ransomware but are essentially just destructive.

Kaspersky Threat Post: 

Secrets of the Wiper: Inside the World’s Most Destructive Malware. “Shamoon, Black Energy, Destover, ExPetr/Not Petya and Olympic Destroyer: All of these wiper malwares, and others like them, have a singular purpose of destroying systems and/or data, usually causing great financial and reputational damage to victim companies.”

ESET has previously published quite a lot of material on Black Energy which can be found here. Of course, other articles are available, but I get to see most of the ESET articles before they’re published, so I’m more aware of them.

Added to the WannaCry (WannaCrypt, WannaCryptor etc.) resources page: 

Bleeping Computer: One Year After WannaCry, EternalBlue Exploit Is Bigger Than Ever

ESET:

David Harley