Tag Archives: Scams

28th August updates – AVIEN Resources

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources

Bleeping Computer: Atlas Quantum Cryptocurrency Investment Platform Suffers Data Breach – “Atlas Quantum said the hacker (or hackers) did not steal any funds from users’ accounts.”

Updates to Internet of (not necessarily necessary) Things

[Many of the Things that crop up on this page are indeed necessary. But that doesn’t mean that connecting them to the Internet of Things (or even the Internet of Everything) is necessary, or even desirable, given how often that connectivity widens the attack surface.]

Security Boulevard: Here’s how anyone with $20 can hire an IoT botnet to blast out a week-long DDoS attack – “This is borne out by Akamai Technologies’ Summer 2018 Internet Security/Web Attack Report.

Updates to Meltdown/Spectre and other chip-related resources

The Register: Linux 4.19 lets you declare your trust in AMD, IBM and Intel – “Wave the the CPU trust flag if you’re feeling safe enough….When random number generation is insufficiently random, encryption based on such numbers can be broken with less effort.”

Updates to Specific Ransomware Families and Types

Security Boulevard: Here’s how anyone with $20 can hire an IoT botnet to blast out a week-long DDoS attack – “This is borne out by Akamai Technologies’ Summer 2018 Internet Security/Web Attack Report.

Updates to Tech support scams resource page

Link to Chainmailcheck article below.

Updates to Chain Mail Check

William Tsing for Malwarebytes: Green card scams: preying on the desperate – Green card scams are far from new. Though in fact this site does actually indicate in the small print that its usefulness to someone wanting to improve their chances of getting a green card via the diversity visa lottery is going to be very limited indeed. But Tsing makes the interesting point that the scam site looks more authentic than the real site because it provides more information, and compares it to “what we see with legitimate tech support and tech support scammers. An official entity does a poor job communicating with its constituency, and that creates a vacuum that scammers are all too eager to fill.” Seems an entirely valid point.

I talked about the issue of inadequate tech support in an article for ESET – Tech support scams and the call of the void – The importance of providing the best possible after-sales service to customers. That article was sparked off by a useful article on the Security Boulevard site by Christopher Burgess on When Scammers Fill the Tech Support Void.

Updates to Mac Virus

Tomáš Foltýn for ESET: Why now could be a good time to fortify your Android defenses
“Stop us if you’ve heard this before: avoid installing apps from outside Google Play. But what if you’re itching to battle it out in Fortnite?”

Follow-up article- interview with Lukáš Štefanko, who says I hope other app developers don’t follow Epic‘s example – “After Epic Games shunned Google Play, debates about threats faced by Android users have taken on a whole new tenor. Joining us to add his voice to the mix is ESET Malware Researcher Lukáš Štefanko”

My own view is slightly (but only slightly) different, as discussed in my MacVirus article: Fortnite and Android: an Epic disagreement

David Harley

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AVIEN resource updates 8th June 2018

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources

Help Net Security: Traffic manipulation and cryptocurrency mining campaign compromised 40,000+ machines – “Unknown attackers have compromised 40,000+ servers, networking and IoT devices around the world and are using them to mine Monero and redirect traffic to websites hosting tech support scams, malicious browser extensions, and so on.”

Updates to GDPR page

James Barham of PCI Pal for Help Net: Shape up US businesses: GDPR will be coming stateside  – “European consumers have long been preoccupied by privacy which leaves us wondering why the US hasn’t yet followed suit and why it took so long for consumers to show appropriate concern? With the EU passing GDPR to address data security, will we see the US implement similar laws to address increased consumer anxiety?” And yes, Facebook gets more than one mention here.

Caleb Chen for Privacy News Online: Apple could have years of your internet browsing history; won’t necessarily give it to you – “Apple has years of your internet browsing history if you selected “sync browser tabs” in Safari. This internet history does not disappear from their servers when you click “Clear internet history” on Safari  … Additionally, the data stored and provided seems to be different for European Union based requesters versus United States based requesters. Discovering these sources of metadata is arguably one of the side effects of GDPR compliance. ”

Updates to Internet of (not necessarily necessary) Things

[Many of the Things that crop up on this page are indeed necessary – you may not be able to read this without a router. But that doesn’t mean that connecting them to the Internet of Things (or even the Internet of Everything) is necessary, or even desirable, given how often that connectivity widens the attack surface. And sometimes even necessary devices entail security risks.]

Stephen Cobb for ESET: VPNFilter update: More bad news for routers 
“New research into VPNFilter finds more devices hit by malware that’s nastier than first thought, making rebooting and remediating of routers more urgent.”

The Register: IoT CloudPets in the doghouse after damning security audit: Now Amazon bans sales “Amazon on Tuesday stopped selling CloudPets, a network-connected family of toys, in response to security and privacy concerns sounded by browser maker and internet community advocate Mozilla.” Commentary by Graham Cluley for BitDefender: Creepy CloudPets pulled from stores over security fears

Updates to Tech support scams resource page

Help Net Security: Traffic manipulation and cryptocurrency mining campaign compromised 40,000+ machines – “Unknown attackers have compromised 40,000+ servers, networking and IoT devices around the world and are using them to mine Monero and redirect traffic to websites hosting tech support scams, malicious browser extensions, and so on.”

Updates to Chain Mail Check

Tomáš Foltýn for ESET: You have NOT won! A look at fake FIFA World Cup-themed lotteries and giveaways

“With the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia just days away, fraudsters are increasingly using all things soccer as bait to reel in unsuspecting fans so that they get more than they bargained for”

Updates to Mac Virus

John E. Dunn for Sophos: Apple says no to Facebook’s tracking
“Later this year, users running the next version of Apple’s Safari browser on iOS and macOS should start seeing a new pop-up dialogue box when they visit many websites…this will ask users whether to allow or block web tracking quietly carried out by a certain co”mpany’s ‘like’, ‘share’ and comment widgets.” And the dialog text in the demo to which the article refers specifically mentions Facebook.

Caleb Chen for Privacy News Online: Apple could have years of your internet browsing history; won’t necessarily give it to you – “Apple has years of your internet browsing history if you selected “sync browser tabs” in Safari. This internet history does not disappear from their servers when you click “Clear internet history” on Safari  … Additionally, the data stored and provided seems to be different for European Union based requesters versus United States based requesters. Discovering these sources of metadata is arguably one of the side effects of GDPR compliance. ”

And from the New York Times: Facebook Gave Device Makers Deep Access to Data on Users and Friends –
“The company formed data-sharing partnerships with Apple, Samsung and
dozens of other device makers, raising new concerns about its privacy protections.” And commentary by Help Net Security: Facebook gave user data access to Chinese mobile device makers, too

David Harley

June 1st AVIEN resources updates

Updates to (Anti)Social Media

Tomáš Foltýn for ESET: More curious, less cautious: Protecting kids online – “How we can help protect a generation for which digital is the way of the world?”

Updates to Cryptocurrency/Crypto-mining News and Resources

Trend Micro: Rig Exploit Kit Now Using CVE-2018-8174 to Deliver Monero Miner

Updates to GDPR page

For Tech Beacon, Richi Jennings curates some blog-y thoughts on GDPR and what comes next from the EU: Think GDPR was a disaster? EU’s ePrivacy Regulation is worse

Milena Dimitrova for Security Boulevard: GDPR Is Affecting the Way WHOIS Works, Security Researchers Worry – as indeed it is, and indeed they should…

Graham Cluley: An advert against online privacy “NO, YOU CAN TAKE ANYTHING… JUST DON’T TAKE MY APPS!” – “The advertising industry … has its knickers in a twist so tightly about European privacy regulations that it made videos like this to try to sway public opinion”

For Help Net, Arcserve’s Oussama El-Hilali discusses The emergence and impact of the Data Protection Officer. Not a bad article, but extraordinarily US-centric in its assertion that “… one of the lesser known mandates of the regulation is the creation of a completely new role: The Data Protection Officer (DPO).” That role, if not necessarily that job title, has long been known in Europe and the UK as a direct result of the Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC, which it supersedes and the UK’s Data Protection Act(s).

Sophos:  European Commission “doesn’t plan to comply with GDPR” – well, sort of

Updates to Meltdown/Spectre and other chip-related resources

The Register: Arm emits Cortex-A76 – its first 64-bit-only CPU core (in kernel mode) – “Apps, 32 or 64-bit, will continue to run just fine as design biz looks to ditch baggage … Linux and Android, Windows, and other operating systems built for this latest Cortex-A family member are being positioned, or are already positioned, to work within this 64-bit-only zone.”

Also from The Register: Spectre-protectors: If there’s something strange in your CPU, who you gonna call? “Ghostbusters in Chrome 67 stop Spectre cross-tab sniffs and more … Enhanced Spectre-protectors will soon come to the Chrome browser … and upgrades for Windows, Mac and Linux have started to flow.”

Updates to Internet of (not necessarily necessary) Things

Dearbytes: Smartwatches disclosing children’s location

The Register: OMG, that’s downright Wicked: Botnet authors twist corpse of Mirai into new threats – “Infamous IoT menace lives on in its hellspawn”. Summarizes Netscout’s research – OMG – Mirai Minions are Wicked – “In this blog post we’ll delve into four Mirai variants; Satori, JenX, OMG and Wicked, in which the authors have built upon Mirai and added their own flair.”

Updates to Specific Ransomware Families and Types

Bleeping Computer: New Backup Cryptomix Ransomware Variant Actively Infecting Users

Updates to Mac Virus

John Gruber for Daring Fireball: 10 Strikes and You’re Out – the iOS Feature You’re Probably Not Using But Should. The feature he’s referring to is the passcode option “Erase all data on this iPhone after 10 failed passcode attempts”. I don’t have an iPhone, so haven’t really looked into the feature, but it certainly seems that it’s a more useful, less daunting option than you might think.

Paul Ducklin for Sophos: Apple’s iOS 11.4 security update arrives in an iCloud of silence – “We updated to iOS 11.4, because that’s our habit – but Apple still isn’t saying what was fixed yet. How we wish Apple wouldn’t do that!”

Updates to Chain Mail Check

Tomáš Foltýn for ESET: World Cup scams: how to avoid an own goal – “Whether travelling to enjoy the matches in person, or watching from home, fans should be on the lookout for foul play” (I always enjoy Tomáš’s wordplay.)

Snopes: Is Starbucks Installing ‘Shatter-Proof Windows’? – “An image circulating online falsely promised “free coffee for a year” to anyone who could damage the company’s new windows.” Put away that bazooka…

David Harley

Reporting cybercrime

I haven’t checked the links yet, but Yasin Soliman’s article for Graham Cluley’s site looks really useful. How to report a cybercrime – Who you gonna call? includes a table with contact points in the US appropriate to several categories: I’m guessing that followers of this blog will find the links for ‘Internet fraud and SPAM’ particularly relevant. There are also links to agencies in other parts of the world.

The trouble with compiling such lists of links (which I’ve done many times over the years, in a variety of contexts) is that the links change over time, not only because web pages get changed around, but because agencies (like security companies) are renamed or replaced, or disappear altogether. Right now, though, this looks like an excellent resource.

David Harley

Phishing attacks strike popular webmail sites

Nothing really new, apart perhaps from the scale of the attacks. This one talks about Gmail, but there have also been recent attacks against Yahoo, AOL and Hotmail.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/8292928.stm

If nothing else, this reminds that we still have a very long way to go on educating the users to phishing. We also have a big problem with SSL – as David pointed out a couple of days ago, SSL is a privacy preserver, not a security measure – and it certainly won’t protect against phishing.

Andrew Lee